Words Brits use that Americans don't?

Discussion in 'U.K.' started by Candy Gal, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Lifetime Supporter Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    Bald as a badger

    Sly as a fox

    Old kiddie
     
  2. Vladimir Illich

    Vladimir Illich Supporters Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter


    Dependent on whether one lives north or south of Watford Gap, one could be a 'foreigner' !!! ;):D:D:D
     
  3. marcco

    marcco Members

    Skin flint ....tight bastard.....lol
     
  4. DrRainbow

    DrRainbow Supporters HipForums Supporter

    Boris. Various meanings.
     
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  5. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Lifetime Supporter Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    Tight Arse = don't want to spend money
     
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  6. oldguynurse

    oldguynurse Members

    Ok, you UK lads, I've finally found a pronunciation you folks use that actually makes sense!

    Over here in the States, one of the cable TV channels runs the program "Wheeler Dealers" which I'm sure some of you automotive types are familiar with (since every time the cost of something is mentioned, the guy speaking quickly converts it from dollars to pounds, implying that it's also shown in the UK). I was watching just now and the guy who does all the mechanical-type stuff was joining two electrical wires together. He pronounced the word, which is spelled "soldering", just as it is spelled. 'sol-der-ing' What? Eh? Here in the States, for some bizarre reason known only to God, it's pronounced 'sautering'. I have never understood that twisting of a word. My faith in you Brits' sanity was restored!
     
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  7. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Lifetime Supporter Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    SAUTERING??? LOL
    oh I see now
    Solder vs. Sauter - What's the difference? | Ask Difference
     
  8. oldguynurse

    oldguynurse Members

    Re: "Tight Arse".

    Same over here (as 'tight-assed'), except it's mostly used in a societal, puritanical sense. Someone 'tightly-wound', a 'no-fun-type', controlled, rigid emotional behavior.
     
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  9. scratcho

    scratcho Lifetime Supporter Lifetime Supporter

    What the hell is -- ------änd Bobs your uncle."?
     
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  10. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Lifetime Supporter Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    It actually means - Well there you go - voila lol
     
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  11. oldguynurse

    oldguynurse Members

    Thanks for the link, CG. But even then, the mid-stage root is from your 'Old English'. So, on this one, I gladly yield to the other side of the pond as more 'accurate' in meaning, as in 'to make solid.' ('course if I said it that way over here I'd get looked at funny.)

    Funny how some of the French pronunciations have made the trip across untouched, yet others got twisted. Living here in Louisiana it's especially noticeable, growing up with certain pronunciations, and meeting those from other parts of the country. Examples:

    Growing up, I went (briefly) to a rural school in south Louisana and heard such as, "Me, I'm gonna go do that, me." Found out later that sentence structure is 17th century French, which continued as what you folks know as "Cajun" French. In the 1970's I went to university in Lafayette, LA and visitors from France would have a tricky time conversing with the rural folks because of the 200 yr gap in word use and structure. It became a source of pride, and there is now an effort to preserve the "Acadian" heritage, music, and language.
     
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  12. oldguynurse

    oldguynurse Members

    I've ALWAYS wondered that one! But I mean,......HOW? What possible reference???
     
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  13. Vladimir Illich

    Vladimir Illich Supporters Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    "Bob's your Uncle" actually refers to pre-decimal coinage where 12 old pennies were a 'Shilling' but in slang were referred as a 'bob' - hence "Bob's your uncle.
     
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  14. oldguynurse

    oldguynurse Members

    Ok, got the monetary reference. But how does 'your uncle' get in there?
     
  15. Vladimir Illich

    Vladimir Illich Supporters Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter


    Any adult male, friend, neighbour etc etc, (without actually being a relative) would be referred to as 'uncle' by children, hence the reference.
     
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  16. Running Horse

    Running Horse A Buddha in hiding from himself

    Just a few I noticed but some Americans do use each of these. Butt is very common for a cigarette where I'm from and we do have butt cans. Twat was popular when I was in high school. Pooch innit too popular but still used by some. Ruckus is something mostly only old folks use
     
  17. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Lifetime Supporter Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    If you Aunty had balls, she would be your Uncle. lol
     
  18. wilsjane

    wilsjane Members

    It seems to me that rather than being different, words go in and out of fashion in different parts of the English speaking world. ;)
     

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