Words Brits use that Americans don't?

Discussion in 'U.K.' started by Candy Gal, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

    I can do both after a few wines. lol
     
  2. soulpoker

    soulpoker Members

    I am familiar with that word. I use/hear it a few times a year.
     
    Candy Gal likes this.
  3. soulpoker

    soulpoker Members

    =grody to the max? (Val speak-San Fernando CA Valley Girl dialect)
     
  4. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

    Bog off. Means get lost.
     
  5. soulpoker

    soulpoker Members

    Also used in the US but usually requiring specifying to whom someone is mouthing off
     
  6. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

  7. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Gob:
    1
    . (n.) mouth, e.g. "Shut your gob" - - (US: "Shut your trap/flap")
    2. (v.) phlegm or spit containing phlegm - - (US: loogie)
     
  8. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

  9. Bilby

    Bilby Freerangertarian Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    Turnpikes were originally a British term, but fell into disuse as responsibility for roads and their funding changed.
     
    WOLF ANGEL likes this.
  10. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Git :
    A derogatory term meaning scumbag, idiot, annoying person (originally meaning illegitimate; from archaic form "get", bastard, which is still used to mean "git" in Northern dialects and is used as such in The Beatles' song "I'm So Tired"(..."you were such a stupid git")) and within the 'Alternative title' of the Monkees hit (Randy scouse git).
     
  11. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

    Broody

    If someone, especially a woman, is broody, she feels as if she would like to have a baby:
     
  12. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Gaff
    Slang name for a house / home.
    Also any other place: cheap music hall, theatre, pub, club, shop, hangout
     
  13. Candy Gal

    Candy Gal Supporters Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator HipForums Supporter

    Naff
    go away.
    "she told press photographers to naff off"
     
  14. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    French letter
    Slang name for a condom
     
  15. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Flyover
    Name for a road crossing over another road (US: overpass)
     
  16. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Fiddly
    Meaning: An action that requires dexterity to operate ("the buttons on the tiny mobile phone were too fiddly")
     
  17. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

  18. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Faff (about)
    Meaning, to dither, futz, waste time, be ineffectual, "I spent the day faffing about in my room".
    Also related noun ("That's too much of a faff")
     
  19. WOLF ANGEL

    WOLF ANGEL Senior Member - A Fool on the Hill HipForums Supporter

    Dual carriageway
    A road, - usually a major one, with the two directions of travel separated by a traffic-free, and usually slightly raised, central reservation.
    Each direction of travel (carriageway) comprises two or more 'lanes'. (US: divided highway)
     
  20. Git v, southern US, as in "Git the hell of my porch."
     

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