What cultures/'civilisations' were animist?

Discussion in 'Animism' started by grim_rebel, May 23, 2004.

  1. grim_rebel

    grim_rebel Member

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    I'm just wondering what specific cultures were animist. I know the Native Indians and Aborigines were/are, any more?
     
  2. Sebbi

    Sebbi Senior Member

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    Shintoism is pretty animistic.
     
  3. white_raven

    white_raven Member

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    According to Daniel Quinn (author of Ishmael), animism died when civilization was instituted. He believes that pure animism can only be found among tribes. Civilization and animism, according to him, are contradictory terms.
     
  4. ~Salli~

    ~Salli~ Member

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    i am so happy to see someone speak of my favorite author mister daniel quinn!!!!!!
    if you ever want the answer to questions of how the world got to be this way just read his books. there is life before ishmael and life after...
    :)
    make sure to read his other books, my ishmael, the story of b, providence, the man who grew young, and many more!
     
  5. kilted2000

    kilted2000 Member

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    The way I understand animisim most cultures had some form of it when they were "Pagan" for lack of a better term
     
  6. xdianax

    xdianax Member

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    I don't remember the names of the specific tribes, but I learned in History last year that hunter-gatherers in Africa were animistic. When certain areas in Northern Africa became Islamic, many animistic beliefs were still rooted in their faith.

    In Kindness,

    Diana
     
  7. AquaSquish

    AquaSquish Member

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    if i recall correctly, most nomadic people or hunter gatherer societies tended toward animism. as many societies changed into stationary societies, their religious beliefs changed to reflect a new way of life, less dependant on wild animals. the roots of most current societies contain some for of animism. i have also heard the theory that civilization excludes animism but i tend to feel this theory to be rather prejudiced in nature. after all, we can hardly say that native american tribes were (or even are) uncivilized. i use them only as one example. it really depends on your definition of civilzation.
     
  8. heron

    heron Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

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    The Celts were animistic, especially in their earliest beginnings. Most tribe based cultures were.

    at one point, everyone was.
     
  9. Burn

    Burn Member

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    Sacredness is everywhere, if you can open your eyes to it. The tree can be your temple, and your worship is no more or less than resting under its shade and eating its fruit. There's no higher or lower, just beauty and sacredness in all.... You can find it anywhere.
     
  10. Aerosolhalos

    Aerosolhalos Member

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    I know animism is still practiced among the nomadic tribes of northern, central and eastern Siberia.. I don't believe civilization is the death-nail for animism, traits of it will always linger within the human psyche. Even modern religions such as Judaism or Vedic Hinduism show signs of believing the world around us is alive, that the veil between this world and the next is in fact very thin.
     
  11. heron

    heron Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

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    Civilization cant kill animism. The world is alive regardless of how "refined" humans may become. The animistic thought might die in man, but the anima never will.
     

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