What activities can COOL members participate in?

Discussion in 'COOL Activities' started by skip, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. Oz!

    Oz! Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    3,617
    Likes Received:
    8
    Then i'd have to agree with bill, it wouldn't interest me in the slightest (apart from maybe a jolly social get-together)... as a non-american, sitting down to a feast and carving a turkey and other of the traditional thanksgiving foodstuffs would have no relevance to me whatsoever. The word Thanksgiving might be ambiguous... but the traditions behind the named celebration certainly aren't.

    I belong to a large (paternal) family of practicing druids.... and i suppose like most that are comfortable with their own religion/ideology.... i feel like Thanksgiving is not only not for me.... but i would be reducing a lot by making the harvest celebrations into a sit-down meal with little actual thanks for the harvest.

    Good luck with it tho'! :)
     
  2. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Don't knock it till you've tried it. You don't know what you're missing. And it's not just food. As I said Thanksgiving is NOT an American tradition, but a pagan one adopted by Americans. Quit saying it's an American thing, cause it's not only that.

    Oz!, evidently you didn't bother to read all it says on that site, cause you'd see it's also a Canadian and UK tradition as well, that predates the American tradition. After all it WAS the English who sat down with the Native Americans for our first one - obviously they brought their English tradition with them. :
    http://www.crewsnest.vispa.com/thanksgivingUK.htm

    Note that their references to "corn" do not mean maize, but what we Americans call wheat. Corn is indigenous to the Americas, so it wouldn't have been part of a pre-xtian ceremony in England.

    Ah, I re-read your post and think I get what you're saying. You mean that the Americanized version of the harvest isn't sufficient celebration.

    Yes, many Americans don't even bother to vocalize their thanks anymore. It's just a party, one which many people don't really like (cause they have to spend time bored with their families), but attend anyway cause it's a family obligation.

    But in reality it's what YOU make it to be.

    As far as the actual Americanized ceremony, with turkey & trimmings, yeah I don't think that's an absolute necessity, and certainly ppl elsewhere can adapt things to their own liking and local produce.

    Indeed I can see a much more spiritually focused celebration. Especially since most people don't need to spend so much time actually harvesting the crops.

    But I think a feast is definitely part of it, after all you reap what you sow, and then EAT IT! :)

    I suppose those ppl who traditionally have called it Harvest Festival can continue to call it that. But thanking all those involved in the harvest (as Americans supposedly do) and the "Great Spirit" for providing the bounty as Native Americans do, is the minimum acknowledgement of the importance of this celebration.

    I think it's also especially important for a community to recognize the importance of such a celebration to thank each other for their support and fellowship.

    BTW, as time goes on I'll be introducing a number of adapted Native American ceremonies into the COOL community. I'm hoping you Europeans will keep an open mind and not state out of hand (without even trying), oh, that's an American ceremony, I'm not really interested in it cause it doesn't relate to me.

    The point I'm making is that these are HUMAN ceremonies. They have great power and meaning for us, wherever we come from.

    The sad thing is, after the first Thanksgiving, things were never the same for native Americans, and their way of life was rarely ever looked at as having anything to offer the Xtian Europeans whose dominating genocidal patriarchial culture soon went on to nearly wipe out all Native Americans.

    We have much to learn from that, and from Native Americans, who may hold the key to saving our race and our planet from humanity's self-destruction.
     
  3. Oz!

    Oz! Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    3,617
    Likes Received:
    8
    That's it exactly :) If COOL itself is to be an all-embracing community, then i think the emphasis should be place on marking the actual Day (wether this be a public holiday in your own countries... or simply the rise of the harvest moon during autumn, or whenever the countries optimal harvest time is)... how individual members celebrate isn't really important... be it sitting down to a turkey dinner with family and friends.... holding a ceremony/prayer while burning the chaff off the wheat fields.... or simply wandering in the country alone in quiet contemplation while gathering wild fruit and berries.....

    Mark the day.... not the tradition :)
     
  4. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Yup, and create our OWN traditions (but they are almost always based upon others that preceeded).

    I can see how COOL would stamp such things with a different approach and ritual. That is what will make them uniquely ours.
     
  5. BlackBillBlake

    BlackBillBlake resigned HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    11,506
    Likes Received:
    1,539
    As a Brit I've really no idea how thankgiving came about - I was under the impression it related to something in US history - like we have 5th nov. 'Guy Fawkes Night' - although I can tell you, I don't celebrate it (as they say, he was probably the only man ever to enter parliament with honest intentions:) )


    I certainly don't object to a feast of some kind around the thanksgiving time, but probably better to re-label it, also as a vegetarian, Turkey is def. off the menu for me.

    With the saints days I meant more like the church dedicates pretty well every day to a particular saint. But dedicating days to a particual message or anything else would be ok I think.

    Also we could celebrate the birthdays of sages we incorporate into the Conscious Bible, as Hindus celebrate the appearance days of Krishna and the rest.
     
  6. SvgGrdnBeauty

    SvgGrdnBeauty only connect

    Messages:
    3,230
    Likes Received:
    5
    If you wanted to keep the traditional harvest feast...just use traditional N. American foods...the ones they taught the settlers to plant: maize, squash (YUM) , and beans
     
  7. SvgGrdnBeauty

    SvgGrdnBeauty only connect

    Messages:
    3,230
    Likes Received:
    5
    I know you were making a point...but please don't use the word heathen...
     
  8. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    I was pointing out how the English settlers viewed those who so graciously helped them survive their first year in America. Turns out it was that tribe's custom (belief/religion) to share what they had, even if it was very little, with others in need.

    Guess that makes them "Godless" savages, heathens, etc. according to Xtianity.

    So glad the Xtian white men tried to cure them of that.

    You can read a lot more on this subject in Robert Roskind's new book, the Beauty Path. I'll post up links to his books soon.
     
  9. themnax

    themnax Senior Member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    4,175
    actualy the REAL origen of the american 'thanksgiving' feast, what it was origeonaly in celibration of, was extremely creepy. what people think they know about it now was a myth created about a hundred years after the fact. (it was the aniversary of having SLAUGHTERED the village and tribe (men, women, children and infants) of the people who helped them survive origeonaly. this is a matter of historical record though it has been well obscuired and you would have to dig rather deep and diligently to find it. and find it you likely won't at your local public library)

    at any rate, celebrating the passing of the seasons and their generosity IS a good thing, and an exciellent opportunity for people to get togather.

    =^^=
    .../\...
     
  10. Oz!

    Oz! Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    3,617
    Likes Received:
    8
    Whyever not? The origin of the word heathen simply means "one who worships on the heather" ..... it was only the christian/roman propaganda that gave the word it's [modern] connotation with "one who is ignorant/barbaric"

    I'm proud to be known as a Heathen :)
     
  11. kitty fabulous

    kitty fabulous smoked tofu

    Messages:
    5,378
    Likes Received:
    18
    Most of the Pagans I know who work with Northern pantheons actually prefer the term "heathen" to "pagan". Those that work with the Southern pantheons seem to prefer "pagan".

    I'm Gaean, and I don't really give a fat damn what people call me.
     
  12. SvgGrdnBeauty

    SvgGrdnBeauty only connect

    Messages:
    3,230
    Likes Received:
    5
    I just don't like that word...because most of the time its spit out with hatred... that's all...its just a thing...
     
  13. BlackBillBlake

    BlackBillBlake resigned HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    11,506
    Likes Received:
    1,539
    'Sticks and stones....'

    I wouldn't let it worry you too much my friend. It's only a word, and there are far worse words even.
    I understood the origin of the word slightly differently from Oz - my understanding has always been that it simply meant originally 'one who lives on a heath'. Hence, I suppose, a rustic type, devoid of the culture of the aristos etc in their mansions, who of course, considered themselves above such riff-raff, and certainly superior in the eyes of God.......
    And also I used to live briefly on Hempstead Heath in London (btw - 'Hempstead, because at one time that crop was grown there).
    And there's Bob Marley's 'Heathen Man'.....
     
  14. Oz!

    Oz! Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    3,617
    Likes Received:
    8
    I've heard that description too.... and being a good ol' country boy... really like it :)

    SvgGrdnBeauty: Heathen is a word i use a lot, and will continue to use where applicable. I can understand your dislike of the word, perfectly understandable as it is often used as a derogatory term, but if I do use it.... you can be assured that it will be as a postive term of description ... not with the negative connotation with which "heathen" is too often associated.

    That's great info! Given the climate in which heather grows... and the culutral use of the word Heath... most intersting...

    Ok, i'm rambling and offering little to the discussion subject of the thread... ignore this one ;)
     
  15. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Getting back to Thanksgiving, it was also a Native American custom as well. In fact the local natives who join the Pilgrims for the first thanksgiving held six different thanksgiving feasts each year!

    For more See:
    http://www.ewebtribe.com/NACulture/articles/thanksgiving.html

    I recommend ppl from the UK read that article too, because it reveals some interesting facts about those Pilgrims/Puritans who came to the US and their political agenda which was the overthrow of the King of England. They were revolutionaries...
     
  16. BlackBillBlake

    BlackBillBlake resigned HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    11,506
    Likes Received:
    1,539
    Sorry to change the subject again Skip, but I was wandering - now we've got the COOL Books subforum, can we have COOL Music ? Because music is definitely something which is part of most people's lives and their spirituality..
     
  17. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Oh yes, music is a central element of our lives and should be a focus of COOL for meditation, celebration and ceremonies. All music is welcome if it fits our theme.
     
  18. BlackBillBlake

    BlackBillBlake resigned HipForums Supporter

    Messages:
    11,506
    Likes Received:
    1,539
  19. themnax

    themnax Senior Member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    4,175
    i think pet rocks could be in here somewhere. i know in this age that may seem trivial. they did when they were popular too.

    but the thing is, about bringing people togather, without telling them how or what to think, well that was and is the thing about pet rocks.

    i mean anyone can pick up a rock, clean it off, paint it and decorate it and make it look like something. but that's just the point. that it IS something everyone and anyone can do. and trade and appreaciate. whatever else our situation at any time or place might otherwise be.

    i just stumbled over this in the nostelgia forum but it occured to me there, that it just might have a place here.

    =^^=
    .../\...
     
  20. skip

    skip Founder Administrator

    Messages:
    12,555
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Hehe...

    My sister has loads of rocks around her house with words carved in them, like peace, harmony, love, etc.

    Rocks also make good meditation tools, such as in a Japanese rock garden.

    Some people just don't understand rocks at all! They have stored energy over eons of time. Rocks are ALIVE, but we have trouble perceiving that. That's our limitation, not the rocks. If we could see how a rock evolved over time, we would understand it more.

    Can you LOVE a rock?

    If you realize that the rock IS GOD, just as much as you or I or Jesus, then you'll be enlightened. Then you can love the rock as you love God.
     

Share This Page


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice