Veganess of wild mushrooms on manure?

Discussion in 'Vegetarian' started by TreePhiend, May 9, 2004.

  1. TreePhiend

    TreePhiend Member

    Ok, so whats the deal here. I know that for all normal gardening purposes manure is to be avoided if the resulting veggies are to be concidered vegan. But what about wild psilocybin mushrooms growing on cow manure? Most of the wild shrooms in the south are found on cow manure. If you ate the shrooms off of the cow shit in the field, you are not buying the cow shit and therefore are not supporting the industry. So, what are your thoughts?
     
  2. Enron

    Enron Member

    I dont really see the problem in that, sure your benefitting off of the cow but not in any way that will fuel the cruelty or the industry.
     
  3. sugrmag

    sugrmag Uber Nerd

    The only thing I would be concerned about is what is in the manure. What hormones or antibiotics or other nasty shit the cow was fed that is in the manure? If it is organic cow shit, then I would say no problem. But...if it's not...
     
  4. TreePhiend

    TreePhiend Member

    This seems like more of an organic issue than a vegan issue, I mean hormones and chemicals are not automatically un-vegan although they can be unhealthy. I see no diffrence between wild shrooms grown on cow manure full of chemicals and store bought nonorganic mushrooms in the organic sense, but in the vegan sense it is boarderline.
     
  5. sugrmag

    sugrmag Uber Nerd

    You're right, tree. It is more of an organic issue, but that is what I would be concerned about. But, not to sound stupid, do all cows have vegetarian diets? I know chickens don't.
     
  6. Bilby

    Bilby Freerangertarian Staff Member Lifetime Supporter Super Moderator

    Let's get something straight.Mushrooms are not plants.They are fungi.Plants are generally autotrophic in nutrition that is to say they feed of inorganic raw materials.Hence the invention of synthetic chemical fertilizers.Mushrooms being fungi are a type of hetrotrophic nutrition known as saprophitic nutrition.This means they are only able to live of dead rotting material.Making mushroom compost is a very exacting business.All commercial mushrooms are produced along organic guidelines because it is simply not possible to grow using chemical fertilizers.
    The idea of vegan organic food has intrigued me for years.
     
  7. Enron

    Enron Member

    Bilby is quite the scientist
     
  8. TreePhiend

    TreePhiend Member

    well, they can be grown on a non-organicly grown substrate, which would make the resulting mushrooms non-organic. Personally, I always use organic grains to make my substrate when growing mushrooms, but I'm not so sure about the ones in the stores.
     

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