Uranium + Western Australia = Death

Discussion in 'Activist Polls' started by LuisBlohkin, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. Driftwood Gypsy

    Driftwood Gypsy Lifetime Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    its not likely that protesting will stop the mining. Uranium is very sought after, and they will do anything to get it.
    I see a lot of sick people in the future.
     
  2. caliente

    caliente Senior Member

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    You're going after the wrong end of the pipeline. This is like protesting the pumping of oil because it's used to fuel bombers. While that's true, it's also used for zillions of other things that are useful to us as a civilization.

    Radioactive materials are used for all kinds of things in modern society, from dental x-rays to cancer treatments to fundamental physics research. But they're also used for nuclear weapons and fuel for submarines, not to mention nuclear power plants. Since you have no way of knowing to which use any given pound of uranium will be put, if you stop the mining, then you also stop the beneficial uses of radioactive materials as well. That's a shotgun approach that: A) will never succeed, and B) demonstrates that you don't really understand what you're protesting.

    A better approach, it seems to me, is to be more selective. Pick the battle that makes the most sense.

    If it's nuclear weapons that you feel strongly about, then put pressure on your legislators to strengthen arms limitations treaties and help stop the spread of the weapons to additional countries.

    If it's nuclear power plants you're concerned about, then work to make licensing requirements stricter. Or better yet, work to prohibit new plants altogether.

    But don't protest the mining of uranium. That makes no sense, and if successful would hamper the positive uses of radioactive materials as well as the negative.
     
  3. LuisBlohkin

    LuisBlohkin Member

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    what i truly want is the uranium to mined somewhere else i know that Radioactive substances are very useful but cant it be found in other places, i mean Collie is already a Coal town isnt that enough for WA i mena we have truckloads of other mioning facilities all over WA is that not enough?
    (My views on uranium have changed since i posted this, sorry)
     
  4. Lafincoyote

    Lafincoyote Member

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    In the South Western US, they have mined uranium for years in this arid, dusty, desert environment. There were many Cowboy films made in this area back in the 50's & 60's, and a higher than average number of film crews and casts developed life taking cancers. The local Indian Reservation populations have been hit with a lot of unusual illness, including various cancers. If I were you, I would seriously consider migrating to another location in Australia to live. Big Money will steamroll any opposition to their plans, and the sheople around you will rally behind corporate profits, as some of the money might find it's way into their pockets. Consider your good health, and get away from there, you can always protest their actions from a safer distance. Good luck!
     
  5. LuisBlohkin

    LuisBlohkin Member

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    Thank you your concern honours me.
    They have already started building the facility.
     
  6. caliente

    caliente Senior Member

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    This is extremely misleading. First of all, the cancers in the Southwest you talk about (which by the way had nothing to do with the film making in Monument Valley and Kanab, Utah and I'm not sure why you made that connection) were primarily found among the "downwinders" from the nuclear weapons testing that was carried out in the Utah west desert in the 1950's. It wasn't the mining.

    The downwinders were innocent victims and the government covered up their medical issues for years. That by itself is enough to enrage any decent person, but put the blame where it belongs, not on the mining.

    Second, the problem with the old uranium mines in southeastern Utah wasn't the uranium per se anyway, it was the tailings that were left behind. Mining technology has improved considerably since then, however, and the tailings problem no longer exists. In addition, most of the old tailings have been cleaned up.

    Assuming the mining in Australia uses modern knowledge and techniques, again I say you're going after the wrong end of the pipeline.

    The far more serious and realistic problems are with nuclear weapons and spent cores from nuclear power plants. Those things have the potential to kill us all. Protest them, not the mining of uranium. Stopping the mining totally would mean losing medical x-rays, cancer treatments, and all the rest. That's throwing out a huge baby with a little bit of bathwater.
     
  7. Lafincoyote

    Lafincoyote Member

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  8. LuisBlohkin

    LuisBlohkin Member

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    caliente you have made your point with the xrays cancer treatings but the thing is that uranium mining is not foolproof things go wrong the thing is i jsut dont want something to go wrong around families and the landscape, plus, the mining is also happening on aboriginal territory the the mining company has only money on their minds not the sacred spiritule land marks of the natives.

    AND!!

    THis isnt happening near you at all your trying to justify something that is not affecting you at all its not your problem at all Western Australians are the ones who are seeing a downfall
     
  9. fragility-1523

    fragility-1523 Member

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    I don't know much about Uranium mining, but I do know that if someone tried to open one nearby to where I live, I'd be angry too. A spillage would disasterous ;o

    I really hope your protests don't go unnoticed. Good luck.
     

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