The Teachings of Don Juan

Discussion in 'Beat and Hippie Books' started by MgicMshroom420, May 2, 2006.

  1. Roffa

    Roffa Senior Member

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    I don't doubt that people have found insight and inspiration in Castaneda's books, but what would have been the harm in publishing them as straight fiction - like, say, Paulo Coelho?
     
  2. isoisidorus

    isoisidorus Member

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    hahaha, most of the stuff is deriviative, from ancient cultures and the stuff your grandfather would tell you...however, today there are truly evil forces running loose through society...
     
  3. isoisidorus

    isoisidorus Member

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    because of that the teachings of Don Juan may be helpful to combat that, today.
     
  4. Lafincoyote

    Lafincoyote Member

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    I loved reading these books, I began reading them in the early 70's. Being Native American helps, as it seems those of a Western Culture background seem to struggle with these concepts. Journey to Ixtlan is my favorite, as it explains how drugs were not necessary to "see", and what Don Juan was actually trying to achieve with Carlos.
    Castenada refused to refute his writings, even on his deathbed. Other investigators claim to have located Don Juan.
    You might want to read something about Native American culture for a foundation before you dive into these books, the story is about a person who can survive in a desert wilderness, providing himself with food, water, shelter, and medicine, all while being able to touch the Universal Spiritual Stream, without any help from Western technology, but who can mingle with modern society without their having a clue that he is a powerful Shaman, who can manipulate the physical world around him.
    All Native American Indian tribes had, and still have Shaman, and in the tribes these individuals are legendary for healing the sick, and being able to manipulate the natural world. All this is, of course, foreign to the accepted Western belief structure, and challenges it.
    So sit back and read these books, and enjoy them, as it is a big Universe.
     
  5. The Imaginary Being

    The Imaginary Being PAIN IN ASS Lifetime Supporter

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    I have read 90% of it, then I promptly lost the book.

    I thought the 4 enemies of the man of knowledge is pretty intriguing stuff. I definitely enjoyed the book, going to have to find and then, finish it.
     
  6. arthur itis

    arthur itis Senior Member

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    My sister used to see Castaneda walking around campus at UCLA, back in the sixties, when he was teaching anthropology there. She described him as a "little man in a suit, carrying a briefcase",,
     
  7. The Earth

    The Earth Om Tare Tutare Ture Svaha

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    I read all of them, except only half of "The Power of Silence" this is something I don't think we even need words for... Most of the time I wanted to jump into the fucking abyss FOR Carlos, because he was so stubborn through out the series...

    I really loved the series though, especially when they explored the different levels of worlds.. there was like a sulphurous plane, and all this really crazy stuff.. and I LOVED Don Genaro, visions of him, swimming on the floor while laughing his ass off, walking up trees, and traveling 300 miles in an instant after walking down a waterfall..all using Carlos's Perception :D

    the main thing though I think is turning off the mind.. If you can learn to do that you can go there too

    Just dont go around touching peoples perceptional egg shaped balls of light

    Theres even another book about a woman who met with Don Juan, Dreams of a Medicine Woman or something like that.. this one is very strange too and I would recommend it
     
  8. Royaltramp

    Royaltramp Member

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    I know this thread is rather old, but I thought I'd bump it. I started with "Journey to Ixtlan" as it was the only one of the series my local library had, after reading that I bought books 1-7 and I'm currently reading the first.

    Regarding the whole "cult" thing, I think there's a good quote in Journey to Ixtlan about it, I can't recall the exact quote but Don Juan says something along the lines of "Of course I lied to you! If I didn't would you have learnt anything?" - and I think the same goes for the books, there's a lot to learn from them, take them with a pinch of salt - don't believe every word he says, but on the other hand don't discount the teachings just because the story behind it may or may not be false.
     
  9. Lumini

    Lumini Member

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    It is a great read, but take it with a grain of salt. It's unclear as to which of Castenada's experiences are real and which are...exaggerated.
     
  10. arthur itis

    arthur itis Senior Member

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    We used to call him "Charlie Castanets".
     
  11. 7he4uthor

    7he4uthor Member

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  12. eightysixed

    eightysixed Member

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    What's really great about Castaneda is that he managed to dupe the whole scientific community with his stuff, at least for a while. But if you need a real information on Native American shamans, I would recommend their authentic songs and stories - for example, a very good book called Hopi Stories of Witchcraft, Shamanism, and Magic.
     
  13. arthur itis

    arthur itis Senior Member

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    The latest studies have found C.C.'s unproven theories,,,

    all entirely factual and true.
     
  14. eightysixed

    eightysixed Member

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    Great, but then what about this one fact? I quote from here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Castaneda#Reception

    What kind of study, I wonder, could deal with that...
     
  15. Yodhe

    Yodhe Guest

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    I read his books when I trained to be a shaman back in the mid 90's.
    It certainly inspired me at the time to dream and believe.
    Now I think of such things with a wry smi²le.
    As for the "worth" of his teachings, I go with what Gurdijeff said at the beginning of
    "Meetings with Remarkable Men." ;)
     
  16. antihippie

    antihippie Member

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    I like the quote from the Erowid website "a romance novel about drugs" it is entertaining fiction but as a self help or historical book it is a fraud. Castaneda got into some cult weirdness before he died, I wouldn't take it too seriously!
     
  17. nannymiss

    nannymiss Banned

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    I read all of his stuff as well as biographies on him, and enjoyed them.

    Sad that spiritual people gain power and are corrupted by it.

    Carlos Castaneda was an extremely hypocritical individual, as well as a selfish predator full of lies and deceit. What a shame.




    lol, word.
     
  18. ChinaCatSunflower67

    ChinaCatSunflower67 Member

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    Anybody have opinions on The Art Of Dreaming? I really am enjoying this book, It is very strange and at some parts (Him wresteling with a black force of energy) had me wondering if I should even finish the book. But I have continued to read and I love this book, even if he is lieing about it all, there is still lots to learn, and the book could do no harm to anyone.oh and responce to older posts, why do people attach so many bad connotations to the word cult?
     
  19. scratcho

    scratcho Lifetime Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    Like any body of work--you take what you need/can use -and leave the rest. They were very interesting to me-a neophyte attempting to gain some spirituality in the 60s. Things are not what they seem-nor are they otherwise.
     

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