Red Bull Stratos - a jump from 120,000 feet above earth

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Dude111, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. Dude111

    Dude111 An Awesome Dude

  2. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    He wore a spacesuit, because he would have frozen solid at that altitude after he suffocated.
     
  3. Dude111

    Dude111 An Awesome Dude

    Yes I imagine so!!!

    THE VIDEO PROVES THE WORLD IS NOT FLAT AS SOME PPL ARE SAYING NOW!!
     
  4. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    The video could be a deep fake, since you can't see anyone's eyes.
     
  5. Irminsul

    Irminsul Valkyrie

    Didn't they do this year's ago?
     
  6. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    A couple of years ago, its still pretty new and he could still hold the record for the only person to basically skydive from space. He was so high up it made Martian atmosphere look breathable.
     
  7. egger

    egger Member

  8. egger

    egger Member

    Youtube video of Joe Kittinger.

    31 km Freefall (Joe Kittinger)

     
  9. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    That's so cool. Five miles high is the tallest mountain on earth, the island of Hawaii, while the tallest mountain in the solar system is Olympus Mons on Mars at 50 miles high. That mountain is so tall, if you didn't know it was there, you would never notice climbing it or when you reached the top, because the slop is that gradual. So tall, that it sticks out of the atmosphere of Mars. Joe skydived from roughly 15 miles high, which is still debatably within the earth's atmosphere. The Red Bull sponsored drop was 80 miles up in the stratosphere, which is bordering on the edge of space, with the latest estimates being that our atmosphere is not quite as thick as we've assumed at around a 100 miles up. Past that, the air is so thin its ridiculous to call it air anymore.
     
  10. egger

    egger Member

    The altitude for Kittinger in 1960 was about 19.3 miles (102,800 ft).

    The altitude for Baumgartner in 2012 was about 24.2 mi (127,572 ft).

    Sufficient atmosphere is present at that altitude to use a balloon as the launch vehicle.
     
  11. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Yeah, even the newer spy planes have limited altitudes and you would need a scramjet to go higher, but they are all classified and only flown at night, with the exception of NASA's experimental model. I would guess it will be someone like Virgin airlines that might pull off the next extreme high altitude skydive, and it would probably require a small capsule that can be ejected. Those jets fly so fast that the flame likes to ignite about fifteen feet behind the engine, and I don't know how slow they can fly in that thin air. The skin of these aircraft gets so hot, instead of aluminum they make them out of titanium and ejecting even someone in a spacesuit at those speeds would be insane. They would require some sort of shielding that allowed them to slow down first, with ablative shielding being possibly the best option, which would burn up before it hit the earth. The skydiver could eject out the back, use the shielding to slow down, then discard it and free fall.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2018

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