Quantum Fluxuations Imaged

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by wooleeheron, Aug 20, 2018.

  1. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Quantum fluctuations successfully imaged

    This is one of those scalar effects I look for constantly, and is related to thermodynamics and how space and time exchange identities. More confirmation that they are rapidly closing in on being able to measure how space and time exchange identities and, for better or worse, how the context can sometimes determine the identity of its own contents. Recently they also recorded the first temperature below absolute zero, which is actually an infinitely high temperature that does not share our space-time. I believe they are close to being able to statistically measure the "chi" of the universe, or dark energy, as the future normalizing the past, which would require a quantum version of Adrian Bejan's Constructal theory.

    One way to think of this is that the Big Bang-Big Crunch merely express paradoxical particle-wave duality, which is humanly inconceivable. Instead of an inconceivable paradox, we observe what appears to be a contradiction and half of life should appear to be contradictory, requiring we cultivate personal integrity for those rough days. However, the paradox also means that time can be conceived of as simultaneously going forwards and backwards, and normalizing its tendency towards extreme random and fated behavior. We perceive the arrow of time because we focus our attention, normalizing our perception, and making more sense out of the chaos. While there have been many interpretations of the Many Worlds theory, my own includes the idea that our future selves normalize our past, excluding the worst possible scenarios including things like Terminator robots taking over the world or cavemen inventing the atom bomb.

    Obviously, that hasn't made earth a Utopia quite yet but, it explains why we haven't managed to destroy the earth yet and all the weirdness with religion and science.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2018
    Mountain Valley Wolf likes this.
  2. egger

    egger Member

    The publication. It's currently not available for free.


    Imaging quantum fluctuations near criticality
    A. Kremen, H. Khan, Y. L. Loh, T. I. Baturina, N. Trivedi, A. Frydman & B. Kalisky
    Nature Physics (2018)

    Imaging quantum fluctuations near criticality
     
  3. egger

    egger Member

  4. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    If I'm right, it means they should see the same fuzzy logic of Goldilocks Murphy, and the Two Faces of Janus. A different line of research into the behavior of gases accidently discovered one gas that spontaneously organizes when they drain almost all the gas out and let it settle into a two dimensional layer at the bottom by chilling the gas. It basically cycles back and forth from orderly to random behavior in a fractal fashion, and we should see that same behavior in these kinds of studies, but always expressed as due to the greater context determining its own contents. It was the density and temperature of the gas that allowed them to see its spontaneous behavior, and these quantum systems should reveal more about how the context determines its own contents by allowing space and time to exchange identities.
     
  5. Mountain Valley Wolf

    Mountain Valley Wolf Senior Member

    This is very interesting, and I am curious to see as ir progresses whether it will deny ir support my own suppositions.

    Here is how I would interpret it----I argue, as you know, that only the present exists in a physical sense. Therefore, space-time is actually space-present. However, because mind is transcendent of physicality, we do not experience a signle present, but a continuing succession of presents. Therefore we can only perceive space as part of a space-time continuum, and time as a movement of time rather than a nonphysical and infinite wave-field.

    I see entropy as a movement of information, literally from one actuality to another, in other words, from one moment of physical present to another. This has led me to believe that the past is set and cannot be changed---even though the math of entropy can go both ways. Therefore I would equate fated behavior with the past. But in reality the future does not exist anymore except as stored information---memory. The future is the wave-field as it is, and represents absolute potentiality. I would therefore equate it to the extreme randomness you refer to. The present, as actuality, is the coming together of the two.

    This is a normalization of memory versus potential; a fated reality versus one of total randomness. But can the future influence the present? I would argue that it certainly can and does. If a superpositioned particle (which is the same as what we actually refer to as a wave) exists all through time and space (i.e. all across space-time) then that particle is here right now even though it is not really here physically until, for example, noon tomorrow. The implication is that there is information of potential futures here right now, but it is not physical---it has to be perceived from a nonphysical level (e.g. mind).
     
  6. neonspectraltoast

    neonspectraltoast Senior Member

    What is the smallest unit of time?
     
  7. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    The HUP should describe the smallest unit of quantized time, but apparently doesn't describe it in geometric terms, which means you have to use the Schrodinger equation and treat geometry as something that emerges from spacetime itself. They used to think particles got astronomically smaller and shorter lived than anything you could hope to measure on earth including neutrinos which are practically nonexistent. We can only infer the existence of such things, and these recent finding are throwing the old Chinese ladder models in the toilet. The mathematics for mirror worlds don't work, but they suggest past a certain point everything gets bigger again because it enters another parallel universe connected to ours. Whatever the case may be, these experiments show how we can measure space and time exchanging identities.

    One possible implication is that it constitutes proof that our universe appears to be both random and fated, because everything obeys particle-wave duality and singularity mechanics.
     
  8. neonspectraltoast

    neonspectraltoast Senior Member

    I ask because if life is a series of presents that are so short lived they're almost non-existent, that's a heck of a lot of presents. It almost seems like time isn't something that flowing from past to present to future, but something that actually moves around in different directions within space itself.
     
  9. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    The present can seem to flash by in an instant or drag out forever, but the laws of physics all reflect our mortal fallibility. Hence, we ourselves help to facilitate the passage of time, the more harmonious we become both internally and externally. To a kid, the day seems to go by fast when they are having fun, to someone at work it can go by fast when they are interested in their work, and so on. Whenever harmony is lost, the arrow of time will be enforced all that much stronger, and you could say the more you decide what your future should be, the less you facilitate the passage of time. Someone in a car accident, can practically slow down the passage of time to zero, because they drop all their unusual internal bullshit to deal with the emergency.

    Thus, time is both quantifiable and empirical, but demonstrably local and nonlocal. It displays the two faces of Janus. Fated and random.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  10. Mountain Valley Wolf

    Mountain Valley Wolf Senior Member

    I use Planck Time which is the smallest unit of time in the sense that below Planck Time physical reality as we understand it could not exist as the differences between the Theories of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics would break it down. It is most commonly used in string theory so that is the magnitude of reality we are talking about. It is approximately 5.3910632 x 10^-44 second----basically a decimal point, 44 zeroes, and then 5391 of a second. It is the time it takes a photon to move 1 Planck length at the speed of light. It is universal measure rather than one that is defined by the context of human experience. In other words, it has nothing to do with the orbit of the earth around the sun or the length of a human defined day, hour, or second. Even though I gave you an equivalent in human defined seconds---it is based on the speed of light (the universal constant) across another measurement (Planck Length) that is also a universal constant.
     
  11. Mountain Valley Wolf

    Mountain Valley Wolf Senior Member

    Correction: THE PAST DOES NOT EXIST ANYMORE EXCEPT AS STORED INFORMATION---MEMORY.
     
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