not signing up with the Selective Service System

Discussion in 'Politics' started by soulrebel51, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. soulrebel51

    soulrebel51 i's a folkie.

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    i got the form in the mail a couple days ago, and i just proceeded to rip it up and throw it in the garbage.

    yes its a felony to not sign up, woopteedoo. I do not support the military, nor do i support the current administration, or any administration thats existed in my lifetime. what the hell is the point in even having a system if there's no possibilty of a draft?

    i'll probably end up signing up via the internet, simply because id like to go to law school and you cant be a lawyer if youve been convicted of a felony i've been told..

    but could i fight it?
     
  2. ChanginTimes

    ChanginTimes Member

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    You are one confused individual...
     
  3. soulrebel51

    soulrebel51 i's a folkie.

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    thanks for the grandness of your post.
     
  4. Eugene

    Eugene Senior Member

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    I signed up for selective service. All that means is that you get your draft card. If there is a draft, i'm planning on moving to an undisclosed english-speaking country for the remainder of the war.
    Bottom line: it doesn't hurt to sign up.
     
  5. soulrebel51

    soulrebel51 i's a folkie.

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    yeah I'm doing it anyway, just to avoid all future hassles.

    they actually give you a draft card? i always wanted to smoke a real one. :D
     
  6. TrippinBTM

    TrippinBTM Ramblin' Man

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    Hmm, i don't remember getting a draft card. I hope I'm not doing something illegal over here. I'm against war and would dodge a draft, but I'm not gonna suffer for not signing a piece of paper that just puts me on the list. Shit, I'm gonna go see if I can find it...
     
  7. Orsino2

    Orsino2 Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

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    Hell, I had to sign a damn thing when I got my permit...

    Then again, I have a foot deformity that would most likely leave me working in offices, I was in the military if there ever was a draft.
     
  8. ChanginTimes

    ChanginTimes Member

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    I signed it several years ago when I got it (because my dad forced me to) but doens't mean I wouldn't resist if a draft would ever come about.
     
  9. taxrefund90

    taxrefund90 Member

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    when i'm 18, i'm just gonna sign it.

    i wouldn't mind doing jail. in fact, i'm kind hoping i am jailed. that would be fun. do nothing all day. talk to yourself. make new friends with other draft dodgers.
     
  10. tigerlily

    tigerlily proud mama

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    so let me ask you.. why be a lawyer if you don't support the laws you'll be upholding? are you looking to change them that way? get into politics later on? i think if you want to change things, you have to put up with what's already established, or else nobody will take you seriously. if you don't follow the laws, who's going to bother supporting anything you want them to follow... am i making sense? just want to know what your motivation is behind becoming a lawyer.
     
  11. seamonster66

    seamonster66 discount dracula

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    Plenty of lawyers are there to push the envelope, to stand up for the little man...there are these two in nyc that I wish I could remeber, they are constanly trying to get the wrongly accused out of jail, defending artists etc...generally doing it pro bono, or for a slight fee

    God i suck with names, but this other one, the one from wyoming who always wears cowboy gear...started working for insurance companies, saw how bad he was fucking over these people, and a few months later was on the other side fighting against the insurance companies.
     
  12. KBlaze

    KBlaze Member

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    Excellent question, if I do say so myself; that's what I first thought when I read the post.

    But then...

    Why don't you go back to 1964 and tell that to MLK and friends.
    Speaking of MLK
    "I feel it is my duty to disobey unjust laws."
    I love that quote; I think that's how it goes, but yeah, wanting to change things is about not putting up with the shit they want you to.

    As far as a draft goes, don't run to canada or any other country!!! I ain't fuckin' moving! I live here, Cali is my home and no foreign conflict is forcing me out of here, draft or not. It would make a huge statement if the folks who were drafted peacefully stayed in their homes and went on with their lives. They're not driving me out with their phony war scare tactics.
    Thanks.
     
  13. tigerlily

    tigerlily proud mama

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    well they did put up with it didn't they? they lived with it, experienced it first hand, and then tried to change it. they didn't run away to another country, but they didn't hide in their basements either.. not to mention they "fought" peacefully. of course the horrors were way more in their faces than signing a draft card. and i see the signing the draft card as showing patriotism more than anything. mainly because i don't see the draft coming back anytime soon. i understand the other side too, don't get me wrong, i wouldn't want the draft instilled again, especially for something like vietnam (which is what iraq is mimicing in some ways) but i don't see your example and signing a draft card as being equivalent, myself. furthermore... the term, "unjust laws" could be applied to iraq's former gov't couldn't it? but i guess you're just talking about conservative international policy where the country only worries about itself?

    i don't think you understood what i meant, though, i guess i'm more of the mindset that you should try to change what you disagree with, but i don't think rebellion is a good idea in this case.
     
  14. tigerlily

    tigerlily proud mama

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    thanks... i'm guessing chuck wants to do the same, but i'm still curious
     
  15. soulrebel51

    soulrebel51 i's a folkie.

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    defense lawyers generally dislike the government and the corporations that are in control of it.

    lmao, i could never fight for "the man" ... :p


    besides, you're not going to cahnge any laws by protesting out on the streets.. that'll only happen in the courtroom.
     
  16. KBlaze

    KBlaze Member

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    Only if you buy into courts.
     
  17. KBlaze

    KBlaze Member

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    They didn't exactly put up with it; they had sit-ins, bus boycotts, etc,
    but what I think about civil disobedience is: it seems people think it's alright when people rebel against a law they don't see fit. So basically, you are admitting law is something you decide to believe in or live by; it is merely an idea, a concept people lean on for security. sure, back in the day government was necessary, but look at the ridiculousness of tdoday's human world on earth; the great ideas and things that helped us progress up till modern times are now holding us back. so that civil rights movement was a precursor to whatever next life movement will come in time. I just think this is an example of how people need to move on from fairy-tale, outside-your-own-mind-government like Santa Clause. Whoa there, captain tangent.

    draft card showing patriotism is debateable, I would sign up for the military if fighting a war i felt worth fighting for, or just fight milita style. But signing a draft, you are pretty much giving your life away, and under most pretences it's for a politician.
    "unjust laws" could probably be applied to any government of all time.
    I'm not talking about anything conservative. [I don't go by the (phony) left-right scale; I go by my experience and judgment.] Iraq is indeed a quagmire of a war; as far as staying or leaving, I think the current Iraqi government should be disbanded and our troops removed, but on stand by incase things are still hellish so they can call for back up, but yes, I think the Iraqi people probably want to rule themselves, and I really want to see a succesful Iraq, but I think that us "helping" them out would probably turn it shitty in ways that we have become. They want their freedom, we should give it to them (though that contradicts my thinking no-one can be "given" freedom).

    I understood, except that sentence right there.
    I never rebel. I live. If other people decide I'm "a rebel" so be it; just don't encroach on my space and I'll do the same. That sentence right there is all humanity needs for a government, in my opinion, which you know by now is quite astute [​IMG].

    Nice discush; hope you enjoyed my novel.
    Peace.
     
  18. KBlaze

    KBlaze Member

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    Oh, and a few more things:

    About comparing the civil rights movement with draft card burning: they were protesting things like voting, job placements, public treatment, all things worthy of fighting for, because they are part of life itself, life is exactly what the draft is forcing you to sacrifice to The State. If armies were in my neighborhood streets taking over you'd better believe I'd be on foot with a rifle, that's also a war worth fighting. Signing a draft card is taking a dive into the grinder, cutting your chances of living in half, signing your soul to Satan.

    And hey, watch out for the draft, it may make a comeback, this time women will be involved.
     
  19. Mind Gardens

    Mind Gardens Member

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    I didn't get a draft card. I think I just had to print off a copy of the signup sheet from the website.
     
  20. thespeez

    thespeez Member

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    The chances of you getting hauled in should you refuse are pretty slim. Less than twenty have been prosecuted since Carter reinstituted registration in 1980. Those that did were very vocal about it!

    http://www.mothersagainstthedraft.org/
    http://www.draftresistance.org/
     

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