Nike still owns sweatshops?

Discussion in 'Globalization' started by green_revolution, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. I know Nike still gets its clothes manufactued oversees in 3rd world countries, but do they still own sweatshops? I know anything made in Mexico these days is pretty much guaranteed to have been made in a sweatshop, but most of nike's apparel comes from china. Anyone?
     
  2. I'd just 'bout bet their crap's still made in substandard conditions. I'm through supportin' that company.
     
  3. Logan9998

    Logan9998 Member

    Whoa, I just rediscovered hipforums, thank goodness I remembered my account information.

    I am actually going to buy a pair of shoes this weekend, I was planning on getting Nikes. If Nikes are manufactored in sweatshops then I refuse to pay them for shoes. Which shoe companies make good running shoes and don't use sweatshops?
     
  4. gardener

    gardener Realistic Humanist

    I think New Balance are about the only ones still made in the US.
     
  5. ineedofname

    ineedofname Member

    New Balance uses sweatshops, NIke still has sweatshops, Reebok just got into the groove of using sweatshops
     
  6. BeaverKoffi

    BeaverKoffi Member

    doest it matter where they are made ? As long as its good quality, that can last at least 3-6 months, buy it, DOesnt matter if its made by traiend animals in Chilie forest.
     
  7. Well, apparently, it matters to some... But look at how much this economy sucks crap, I buy what I can afford. Hand-made ethical clothing costs three to five whole cents more than something made by a blind, deaf, mute, and retarded Malayan child... Also, since the image of one of life's little write-offs using a sewing machine never ceases to amuse me.
     
  8. MikeE

    MikeE Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    3-6 months is crap quality! Go to a local craft fair, hook up with a shoe maker, spend the money (yes, real quality costs money) and wear shoes that will last for many years. You'll need to have them resoled occasionaly, but that's much cheaper and easier than buying crap footwear.

    Oops, I forgot about style. Your shoes will be out of style after a while. But your feet will be comfortable.

    By the way, where does one get good socks? I can't find a pair that lasts more than a month.
     
  9. gardener

    gardener Realistic Humanist

    Matters to me, I'd rather go barefooted. Attitudes like this just fuel the corporate greed that manipulates our world.

    http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:45fkr-4sguwJ:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweatshop+new+balance+shoes+sweat+shops&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=2
     
  10. you think they'd have learned by now!
     
  11. wisefusion563

    wisefusion563 Member

    !Boycott Nike!
    [​IMG]
     
  12. dd3stp233

    dd3stp233 -=--=--=-

  13. One thing most people ignore is the fact that these "sweatshops" have financed China's industrial revolution; which means sweatshops were encouraged, and still are, by the Chinese government. Seeing as how they are communist, you'd think that whole concept would have been wiped out, but in many rural cities, far from.

    The big cities are amazing though, I have a society and environment prof who immigrated from China and couldn't say good enough things about it. Thing is, it's just like anywhere else, right? We get all worked up about it, and yet our country is supporting the US in their massacres across the globe, including down south (though many don't know about that, because all eyes are turned towards the middle east at the moment).

    All things considered, sweatshops provide revenue for families who would otherwise have none, and it has managed to pull a country that had an almost deperately poor population into an industrial boom...

    The literacy rate has risen drastically and the population is on alltogether better feet than it ever was... I'm not saying that I condone it, but I think there are two sides to every issue, and that both need to be examined before we start freaking out.
     
  14. dontbrandme

    dontbrandme Member

    well, it matters if you care about the living conditions of other people on the planet (which plenty of people actually don't). i believe it is worth making small sacrifices to encourage positive change on the planet.

    they will not learn until they see an impact on their bottom line. at the moment, as outraged as we all are, we still buy products made in these horrific conditions, so it is still profitable for them to use these means. if we, the all-powerful consumers, speak with our dollars they WILL begin to listen.

    this is true. but it is also true that the power (by virtue of size) of these corporations afford them unfair power in negotiations. third world countries want the $$s that they will bring into the economy, but they need this money so bad that they allow unspeakable crimes (low wages, inhumane conditions, unfair treatment and exclusion of unions) to be committed because they know that if they criticise then the corporation will simply close up shop and move to a more accommodating host country. this is bullying and should not, in my opinion, be condoned.

    one brand i know about is NO SWEAT. they sell these products in trade aid shops here. they are made in third world countries (so they still inject much-needed jobs and money into the economies) but with humane conditions and fair minimum wages.
     
  15. AfricaUnite

    AfricaUnite Member

    In answer to the sock question, I buy my socks from a store in canada called Mark's work wearhouse they are called sports socks, theyre pretty thick, all cotten and 3 pairs for $9 or $10. I ask for them for christmas and birthday, I now have a basket full of them that would probably last 2-3 years.

    Socks are tricky they get a lot of wear around the toes and heal. WIth a sewing machine repairs can be made to socks, but I just use them for rags as I cant sew.
     

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