Native American Book

Discussion in 'Books' started by behindthesun93, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. So.
    I'd like a book about the native americans.
    Not so much one about how they were massacred and how we took their land. More of what their spirituality was, rituals, what they ate, how they live, etc etc.
    any ideas?
    thanks
     
  2. deleted

    deleted Visitor

  3. any other suggestions please? :(
     
  4. deleted

    deleted Visitor

  5. wally m

    wally m 14

    Go to abebooks.com and get Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World
    Jack Weatherford
     
  6. icevrething

    icevrething Member

    Read Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. You won't regret reading that one.
     
  7. deleted

    deleted Visitor

    ^ yes, ive read that, Very good..
     
  8. Quoth the Raven

    Quoth the Raven RaveIan

    ^^ yup. Black Elk Speaks is another good one, I've read quite a few but can't remember the names off the top of my head.
     
  9. MeAgain

    MeAgain Dazed and Confused Staff Member Super Moderator

    Run right out and buy Seven Arrows, by Hyemeyohsts Storm. It's about the medicine wheels. I haven't read his other two books.

    Also Rolling Thunder, by Doug Boyd, about John Rolling Thunder Pope, Cherokee medicine man died 1997. I believe Bob Dylan named his Rolling Thunder Review after him.

    And The Good Medicine Book, by John TwoHawks

    Good Medicine Books, Adolf Hungry Wolf
     
  10. eightysixed

    eightysixed Member

    The Winged Serpent: American Indian Prose and Poetry by Margot Astrov. This is one of the best collections of Native American literature with a very good, thorough introduction.
     
  11. spirit of the night

    spirit of the night Senior Member

  12. zombiewolf

    zombiewolf Senior Member

    " Hanta Yo" by Ruth Beebe Hill

    It's not history, but it is an impressive (and I believe honest) attempt to make accessible a culture about which many of us have admittedly shallow or misinformed understandings.

    ~
     
  13. caliente

    caliente Senior Member

    The Fourth World of the Hopi by Harold Courlander. A large collection of the oral tradition of the Hopi people of Arizona, going back thousands of years. The Hopi are well-known for the purity of their oral history, and these stories explain how and why they came to live in the desert Southwest, and who they are as a people. Fascinating reading. Compare this to ...

    The Book of the Hopi by Frank Waters. A classic. Contains a detailed history and ethnology of the Hopi, but told from the white viewpoint.

    The Book of the Navajo by Raymond Locke. An exhaustive history of the Navajo people.

    As for fiction, try these ...

    Little Big Man by Thomas Berger. An epic story of the old west, particularly the Native side. Berger himself is not Native, but the accounts of Cheyenne life on the northern Plains are meticulously researched.

    Fools Crow by James Welch. Welch is from the Blackfoot tribe in Montana, and this beautiful story is set against backdrop of the conflicts as whites first began to enter their territory.

    Anything by Leslie Marmon Silko. She is part Laguna Pueblo, and a magnificent writer.

    Someone mentioned Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. If you haven't read this yet, you probably should, but be prepared to get very angry. The first time I read it, at one point I literally flung the book across the room in frustration and rage at what our government did to these people.

    Movies?

    One of my alltime favorites is "Black Robe". The "black robes", of course, were Jesuit priests who went among the tribes trying to convert them. The photography in this is stunning, and the story quite dramatic.

    "Little Big Man" again. Dustin Hoffman is wonderful in this.

    EDIT: Of this group, the only one that doesn't involve the conflict with the "Napikwans", as the Blackfoot called the white invaders, is The Fourth World of the Hopi. It's as though most white writers, and many Native ones as well, consider that to be the most interesting aspect of Native history.
     

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