Falling in love affects your brain about the same way as smoking crack

Discussion in 'Relationships' started by RainyDayHype, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. RainyDayHype

    RainyDayHype flower power Lifetime Supporter

    Enjoyed this article, thought I'd share it


    "Falling in love affects your brain about the same way as smoking crack,” says Ethlie Ann Vare, author of “Love Addict: Sex, Romance, and Other Dangerous Drugs. “It has essentially the same effect on what’s called the reward center of the brain.”
    Once smitten, these “love” chemicals surge and their health effects are set in motion. Some people, like Francoeur, are particularly hard-hit. Here’s a few of love’s side effects. They don’t call it lovesick for nothing.

    Can’t sleep
    Having a hard time sleeping is a direct result of too much dopamine and norepinephrine. “You’re on a speed high,” says Dr. Helen Fisher, author of “Why Him, Why Her?” and a leading love researcher at Rutgers University. “This is why you have so much energy, why your face is flushed, and why you can walk till dawn and make love around the clock.” Francoeur says the first time she and her beloved were together they didn’t sleep for three nights. She then put in ten hour days at work. “I literally burnt the candle at both ends for two years.”

    Can’t eat
    Francoeur describes having lunch with a friend while lovestruck saying “she’s ordering everything on the menu and I can’t even swallow.” Psychologist Dorothy Tennov coined the term “limerence” to explain this crazy phase of infatuation. Limerence is the obsessive, intrusive, and all-consuming state we’re in where we justify letting work, friends, responsibilities — even ourselves — slide so we can satisfy our unquenchable thirst for our new partner. Friends questioned Francoeur’s weight loss — about 15 pounds — but she was apathetic to do anything about it. Thankfully, studies show these intense feelings only last somewhere between six months to two years.

    Can’t concentrate
    You may think very clearly, but you can’t think about anything but him or her. It’s the dopamine that gives you that obsessive focus. Romantic love is an obsession. You can’t stop thinking about the person. But you’re thinking of every detail of them: what he said, how she moved, what he meant by that. You’re focused — just not on work or your to-do list. Not surprisingly, some of us actually chase lovesickness. “Probably about 6 to 10 percent of the population is born with poorly functioning dopamine receptors,” says Ware. To them, everything feels a little black and white blah until they are shot with cupid’s arrow and get that reward cascade cocktail of neurotransmitters pumping. Then they think, “Wowsa! Life is in color!” And they continue to chase that feeling. Problem is, nature didn’t expect for us to spend that long in the pursuit period. Nature expects us to settle down and procreate."



    Read more: http://www.today.com/id/44010532/ns...-deeply-how-love-makes-you-sick/#.UgF-dG0yiuA
     
  2. wobs

    wobs Senior Member

    well my brother told me , if it is anything like his wifes it must be f**king dangerous!
     
  3. CarlosDanger

    CarlosDanger Member

    a man in love

    [​IMG]
     
  4. deleted

    deleted Visitor

    women crave cocks like crackheads crave glass dicks..
     

  5. Tyrone.... can I please have some of the crack sammich?
     
  6. Pressed_Rat

    Pressed_Rat Do you even lift, bruh?

    Send those women my way.
     
  7. anyways, I believe in love like long term love but when people think they are falling in love and think it's a thing I find it funny because I know it's just a chemical reaction- meaning it doesn't exist as people think it does.
     
  8. usedtobehoney

    usedtobehoney Senior Member

  9. lilomatt34

    lilomatt34 Banned

    Yep, been there!
     
  10. mvmcd1950

    mvmcd1950 mvmcd1950

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