Earth's Black Box

Discussion in 'Latest Hip News Stories' started by ~Zen~, Mar 31, 2024.

  1. ~Zen~

    ~Zen~ Ancient Mariner Administrator

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    The construction of Earth's Black Box, a 32-foot steel monolith in Tasmania, is set to be completed this year.

    This unique structure will be filled with hard drives documenting our actions regarding climate change, providing an unbiased account of the events that may lead to the demise of our planet.

    This innovative project aims to capture crucial data about Earth's climate and serve as a record of our impact on the environment.
    earths black box.JPG

    Sonia von Bibra, national head of production at Clemenger BBDO and chair of Earth’s Black Box, said construction will start and finish in 2024. 'Whilst it is not yet built, we anticipate having it completed this year.'

    earths black box2.JPG
    Images from the Daily Mail
     
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  2. wilsjane

    wilsjane Nutty Professor HipForums Supporter

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    The test of time as to whether disk or SSD drives last the longest will be revealed.
    With todays cloud based storage, will the cut off year be around 2030.
    Then when they open the box, will any museum still have the operating system to open the drives.

    Trust me to put both feet in everything, particularly since all plastics are biodegradable. :D
     
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  3. Native Vee

    Native Vee Members

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    Looks very interesting!
     
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  4. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter

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    Our gestures always matter, but how much is debatable.
     
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  5. Toker

    Toker Lifetime Supporter

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    Like the gold disc they put on Voyager, the likelihood of anything we communicate will be understood by another species is virtually nil.

    So yeah these are just gestures to make us feel good. More likely if some superior civilization were able to decifer Voyagers disc they would come to earth for conquest rather than make nice.

    We'd be lucky if they didn't bring their cookbook, you already know the title...To Serve Man. Gort and Klatu are hungry!

    I can imagine some cosmic lifeform that devours stars whole then shits out planets and pisses comets. Have I anthropomorphized enough?
     
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  6. ~Zen~

    ~Zen~ Ancient Mariner Administrator

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    I think the idea is questionable to say the least... reminds me of the seedbank created in the Arctic Circle somewhere...but now the ice and permafrost are melting.

    932px-Entrance_to_the_Seed_Vault_(cropped).jpg

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Svalbard Global Seed Vault
    Location Spitsbergen
    Town or city Longyearbyen
    Country Norway
    Coordinates 78°14′09″N 15°29′29″E
    Elevation 130 m (430 ft)
    Groundbreaking 19 June 2006[1]
    Opened 26 February 2008[2]
    Cost 45 million kr[3]
    (US$8.8 million, 2008)
    Technical details
    Floor count 1
    Floor area c. 1,000 m2
    (c. 11,000 sq ft)[4]

    The Svalbard Global Seed Vault (Norwegian: Svalbard globale frøhvelv) is a secure backup facility for the world's crop diversity on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen in the remote Arctic Svalbard archipelago. The Seed Vault provides long-term storage of duplicates of seeds conserved in genebanks around the world. This provides security of the world's food supply against the loss of seeds in genebanks due to mismanagement, accident, equipment failures, funding cuts, war, sabotage, disease and natural disasters. The Seed Vault is managed under terms spelled out in a tripartite agreement among the Norwegian government, the Crop Trust, and the Nordic Genetic Resource Center (NordGen).[

    The Norwegian government entirely funded the Seed Vault's approximately 45 million kr (US$8.8 million in 2008) construction cost. Norway and the Crop Trust pay for operational costs. Storing seeds in the vault is free to depositors.
     
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  7. wilsjane

    wilsjane Nutty Professor HipForums Supporter

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    Wow, our future world consisting entirely of vegetation, with no one to plant, maintain, or provide the carbon dioxide to feed it.
    Perhaps it is time for Norway to invite the horny brigade over to store their seeds.:)
     

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