Best Browsers and Other Things for Internet Privacy?

Discussion in 'Computers and The Internet' started by newbie-one, Jan 25, 2022.

  1. newbie-one

    newbie-one one with the newbiverse

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    I think maybe firefox used to be good for this, but imho, that fact that you're forced to have a default embeded search engine is highly suspicious.

    Dillo seems to be a good web browser, but breaks nearly every site.
     
  2. Very Fast Car

    Very Fast Car Members

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    Chromium is supposed to be one of the better ones for privacy.
     
  3. newbie-one

    newbie-one one with the newbiverse

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    I believe chromium is made by google, so it's very hard for me to imagine that chromium offers any privacy whatsoever. Maybe it's secure, or fast, but it seems like google's whole business model revolves around the monitization of personal information.
     
  4. Boozercruiser

    Boozercruiser Kenny Lifetime Supporter

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    ......
    Do yourself a favour my friend.
    You can do an add on with Firefox for search engine Ducktogo

    ducktogo at DuckDuckGo

    I find it really very good for extreme privacy, so please read up about it through the below link.

    Best regards

    Kenny
     
  5. Very Fast Car

    Very Fast Car Members

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    Tor is probably the safest browser, but because of all it's built in safety, it can be slow and won't work properly with many sites, especially on it's safest settings.
     
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  6. Boozercruiser

    Boozercruiser Kenny Lifetime Supporter

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    And that is what I found VFC.
    Which is why I don’t use it even though it most certainly is the best for total ptivacy.
    I find Ducktogo very fast indeed though.
     
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  7. M_Ranko

    M_Ranko Straight edge xXx

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    Librewolf: LibreWolf

    A hardened fork of Firefox. This project seeks to eliminate as much of the Mozilla telemetry and tracking found in vanilla Firefox as possible. Ad-blocking built in. So far looking good. Linux versions hard require a version of GTK3 that has Wayland graphics processing enabled. Windows builds hard require Visual Studio 2013 Visual C++ libraries (vcredist_x64.exe). No 32-bit versions available. Doesn't do .onion routing (Tor).

    UnGoogled Chromium: Download latest stable Chromium binaries (64-bit and 32-bit)

    A custom Chromium build by Marmaduke seeks to strip and disable all Google tracking and telemetry. For maximum website compatibility, this is your best bet. System requirements are the same as vanilla Chrome's.

    Pale Moon: The Pale Moon Project homepage

    A radically enhanced and updated version of old series 27 Firefox with lots of custom code to make it much more secure and as-up-to-date as possible. Has retained support for the XUL-based extension technology from Firefox of old. This one is exceptional in that the developers take security and privacy exceptionally seriously. Pale Moon is free of tracking and telemetry out-of-the-box. On the downside, the browser's code base is starting to be very old. Many popular websites have begun to break badly due to the lead developer's stubborn refusal to update the web rendering engine to something more current. Supports Windows 7 or later, or Linux at least down to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.
     
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  8. desert-rat

    desert-rat Senior Member

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    I like opera myself. It's cross-platform. Win Mac Linux.
     
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  9. newbie-one

    newbie-one one with the newbiverse

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    I checked out Pale Moon, but the version for the raspberry pi is out of date and not recommended.

    Librewolf sounds good, but I'd have to get at 64-bit ARM OS. They say "Yes, we provide native builds for both Intel and ARM based machines." though.
    Frequently Asked Questions – LibreWolf
     
  10. newbie-one

    newbie-one one with the newbiverse

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    Yeah, it seems like browsers that have the best security will also often break sites.

    Looks like Tor is easy enough to install on my machine.

    "Install Tor on the Raspberry Pi. You can install Tor with a single Terminal command: sudo apt install tor."

    Tor Browser For Raspberry Pi
     
  11. M_Ranko

    M_Ranko Straight edge xXx

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    Pale Moon doesn't support ARM-based platforms anymore. They don't have the resources for that. This is also part of why they dropped MacOS support. Apple is switching their future product lines to ARM processors, meaning all Pale Moon releases for Mac would have to be designed against that one separately. They simply can't spare the resources for that.

    Yeah, Librewolf is 64-bit only. No 32-bit builds will be provided. I think you'll probably have to roll up your own, if you want 32-bit support. In general, software developers are now slowly abandoning all 32-bit platforms, as 32-bit only processor tech is aging technology, and developers no longer want to provide separate builds of their software for these older systems. The future is going to be 64-bit only, and that's just the reality of it.

    Have you thought about buying a retired business Thinkpad? Ex-corporate laptops can be bought relatively cheaply from the 2nd hand market, they're easy to set up for Linux and being 64-bit Intel based at least from 2010 onwards, most any software is available for them.
     
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  12. newbie-one

    newbie-one one with the newbiverse

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    I got Dell laptop a while back, but it's got V-Pro, which is a huge privacy/security vulnerability.

    The raspberry pi 4 has a 64 bit processor, so I could put a 64 bit OS on it and use 64 bit browsers. For some reason 32 bit OS's seem to be more developed for ARM. I think I used to know the reason for this, but it escapes me.
     

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