Arthur, NE

Discussion in 'Communal Living' started by Duncan, May 8, 2004.

  1. Duncan

    Duncan Senior Member

    We had an interesting thread going on the old board about buying up a county that has had a low population. The maker of the thread was originally talking about Arthur, NE

    Have you found out anything about the county?
     
  2. eccofarmer

    eccofarmer Member

    NAMASTE

    I am from Nebraska and back at this time seeing old friends.I will check into it if you want and see what i can find out.
     
  3. Bee_Rain

    Bee_Rain ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Can a county actually be bought? I'm over in Dawes county by Wyoming and South Dakota.

    On my way moving here, I went through many "towns" that had populations of 200 or less.

    I'm curious how the county would feel about hippies buying them. It would make some interesting dinner conversation.:)
     
  4. Duncan

    Duncan Senior Member

    Perhaps buying the county out was not the proper choice of language. The original poster was talking about moving into a county that had a population of under 500 and a number that hadn't been changed in over a decade. Obviously, there are reasons why some counties are that way. We looked at--for example--Loving County, Texas. While there aren't a lot of people living there, there is probably a wealth under the top soil in the form of crude oil. There is little chance that that real estate would be sold.

    It was the original idea that if like-minded folks moved into a region and were able to set up on a county-wide basis, the infrastructure would be able to have a more powerful support system. Of course, if everyone is poor, winters are cold, people are unskilled and natural resources (i.e. wood, coal, water) are low, then your little burgh would just be useless.

    Anyway, that was the original poster's notion. I just thought I would pass the thought along.
     
  5. sonik

    sonik Member

    Very interesting idea. If you got enough people in an area you could get majority votes going and take control of the local government! lol

    :cool:
     
  6. eccofarmer

    eccofarmer Member

    NAMASTE

    This has been done in the staes.Oregon for one when osho moved all these folks in and took over the local gov.Utah with the mormons.Many towns there i have been threw are owned by the church.Places like the black hills in south dakota,Maine were i live part of the year the land is realy cheap
    and eastern parts of oregon were there is not alot of people mostly ranch land and the prices for oregon are not bad.It has been done but it takes lots of energy time and money.At least that what that seems to me.
     
  7. eccofarmer

    eccofarmer Member

    NAMASTE

    Hey why Arthur NE anyway???????????
     
  8. Duncan

    Duncan Senior Member

    The counties were chosen based strictly on population size per decade period. The original poster was looking for extremely small original populations in an entire county (~<200) and he said that there should be little fluctuation in that number +25 over a period of ten years.

    I believe Arthur County, Nebraska was one such place. Once the venue is examined, the next steps would be to see what the county resources are, where the land is deeded, why the population is what it is, etc. There are a whole host of variables.

    Some places are not near water. Some places might be Native American reservations. It could be the land has rich ore, oil or other deposits on it and that it is used for drilling or mining and nothing else.

    I am not in a position to make any moves in my life. I'm pretty much stuck where I am for the next 2-4 years, but I have some investment capital and am always looking at places to retire.
     
  9. skitzz

    skitzz Member

    Hey I live in Nebraska. I can do some research on the place for ya.
     

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