A-dam - Denmark

Discussion in 'Amsterdam' started by not-alone, Mar 20, 2011.

  1. Asmodean

    Asmodean Slo motion rider

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    Based on my experience I could say you don't have to look out at all. But yeah, I heard it too much from other people to say it's without any risk. :D
     
  2. not-alone

    not-alone Guest

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    Yeah, you never know.
    There's emotional factor when cops stop you. They have the smell for nervous people so they act according to what they see.

    Once it happened to me, my friend decided to make me an surprise, I had to fly with connecting flight through 2 countries and one of them has very very tight security and usually find even 1/4g of stuff. Well, so he put 4g of stuff into my luggage without me knowing it + he made an space cake (HUGE space cake). I wasn't aware of that at all, it all went smooth. I just found treats as I arrived to the point of destination.. :D
     
  3. McLeodGanja

    McLeodGanja Banned

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    If they can't prove it is yours then there is no problem, other than the fact you just lost your hash.

    It is highly unlikely you would get stopped by the police if crossing by foot, and you'd see them coming. Make yourself look like a dumb tourist who got lost and didn't realise you had crossed the border.
     
  4. arthur itis

    arthur itis Senior Member

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    Sorry. My bedbug information may have misled you a bit.

    Yes, the "cheap hostels" can have bedbugs.

    But also, the finest accommodations can have them as well.

    In New York, for instance, they are having a difficult time with bedbugs in hotels, and not just the cheap ones. Some say that New York is "the bedbug capital of the world".

    So, just be careful. Don't sit your luggage on the bed, or the ground, but on a luggage rack, if they have one. Check the edges of the mattress for small black spots that look like pepper. Bedbugs mostly come out at night, late, or early in the pre-dawn hours, when people are asleep. They have their feast, and then go back into hiding. You may not know it unless you see blood trails on your sheets or pillows, from the bites they've made, sucking your blood.

    If you want to know more about them, PM me. My son had an infestation at his college dormitory. I've done much research, and taken precautions when he comes home to visit, with his clothing and luggage.
     
  5. not-alone

    not-alone Guest

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    Hi Arthur,
    thanks for your response.

    Yes, that would be really interesting to hear, just the problem is that I cannot PM you, it says I do not have permission for that ( I guess it's because of my 'guest' status );

    So either you could try to PM me (maybe I am able to receive PM's) or just post here if You don't mind.

    Thanks!
     
  6. arthur itis

    arthur itis Senior Member

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    Well,,all I know about bedbugs is that they are difficult to get rid of, once they get a foothold. They are not "dangerous", but are terribly annoying. They have two little hypodermic needles, so when they get on you, late in the night while you are sleeping, they firstly inject you with an anesthetic, so you will not feel the next one, which is the one that sucks blood. They fill up their little transparent bodies with blood, and turn a dark color. If you roll over on them they squish on the pillow or the sheet. The bites are linear,,i.e.,,in a line from one point to another as they travel a little as they feed on you.

    Some people react differently than others, as some are allergic to the bite, while others, it doesn't seem to phase them one bit.

    You can see on the mattresses, which is where they live and multiply, their droppings, like "pepper". They tend to stay in the edges of the mattress, where the beaded edge is.

    They are very small, to maybe 1/4" at the most. They can hide in luggage, in the seams or in any crease, since they can lay flat as a pancake. If two, a male and female come home with you, they can live for up to a couple of years, even if in an enclosed environment, during which time they can create thousands of other little buggers.

    They can climb the legs of the bed, live in the rug, on the wall, even up on the ceiling, where they can then drop down like paratroopers onto the bed to re-infest.

    It's best to get rid of them as soon as possible, before they become a large-scale infestation.

    Two things can kill them related to temperature: Heat, above 115 degrees or so fahrenheit, for a period of an hour or two, or cold, freezing them for a couple of weeks. In order to heat them up, the dwelling place can be steam cleaned, by a professional, or simply heated, with all the windows closed and the heat turned up all the way, for a period of an hour or two. However, they often escape into the walls, through electric outlets and such, and then re-infest, unless the wall sockets have been treated. Suitcases and such can be treated by leaving them in a hot car in the summertime. Or, you can put luggage into a freezer for a couple of weeks, if you have access to a freezer large enough, and can be without your luggage for a length of time.

    They can also hide behind things on the wall, like picture frames, if the infestation spreads.

    In order to keep them from coming up the legs of the bed from the floor, people often use a glass jar, or some sticky material on the bed legs, like duct tape,,anything that impedes their progress.

    Powders that work against them are diatomaceous earth, and boric acid. The diatomaceous earth is really tiny, sharp skeletal remains of diatoms, which are microscopic animals. You can buy it by the pound. The bugs crawl over the powder and it cuts their exoskeleton, so that their bodily fluids dry up and they die.

    Also plain rubbing alcohol kills them. Put some in a spray bottle and use it liberally on your shoes, etc. It is non-staining and safe to use, if not around a flame.

    Whatever the case, once they infest, they are difficult to get rid of, and probably will require repeated treatments by yourself or a professional. Many have reported that rather than trying to get rid of them on bedding, they simply dispose of the bedding, especially box springs, into which the bugs find many nooks and crannies to hide.

    If you wish to keep the mattress, you can simply buy a mattress cover that is made to completely seal the mattress, with a bug-proof zipper, so that they dont' get out that way. Inside the mattress cover, they may live for up to a year and a half or so, but eventually die off if they have no blood to feed on.

    Super-hot water and heat from a clothes dryer on high will kill them as well, if it doesn't ruin your clothing/bedding.

    Google "bedbugs" and you will get a lot of good advice. I spent a good two weeks doing this when my son had an infestation in his dorm.
     
  7. not-alone

    not-alone Guest

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    Thank you for sharing this knowledge Arthur. It was really interesting to find that out.. I had no clue such creatures exist 0_o
     

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