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2/3 Of Wild Life Potentially Gone By 2020




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#1 guerillabedlam

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Posted October 27 2016 - 11:38 PM

This story raises some troubling predictions, I know the particular methodologies that lead to the figures in the title and article have been called into question, however it's based off a trajectory of current wildlife decline since 1970..  Even if there is some imprecision in the predictions, it is still pretty sad that this is happening to the extent it is and some are calling it the next mass extinction event. To go along with these events, I believe there is also a push to say that we are moving to a new "Anthropocene" geological era.

 

 

http://www.complex.c...ld-life-by-2030

 

 


The animals being lost are diverse, coming from all kinds of environments. For example, the number of elephants has dropped by about 20 percent in a decade, and a third of sharks and rays face extinction because of overfishing. But rivers, lakes, and wetlands have been the hardest hit habitats, suffering an 81 percent decrease in their species population since 1970. Marine life hasn't had it as rough as freshwater species, and only experienced a 36 percent decline. Land populations declined by 38 percent.


3i6eiPI.png?

 


#2 relaxxx

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Posted October 28 2016 - 02:22 AM

Meanwhile the local deer, raccoons, and coyotes around here are booming out of control. Any animal species that can learn to leach off human stupidity will do alright. Well, until we finish the planet off for human life. Which is looking to be a lot sooner than most people think. 

 

2016 hit 1 full degree above normal average Earth temperature anomalies. That may not sound like much but scientists have been saying for decades now that a 2 degree difference will be apocalyptic. The irreversible point of a massive human extinction level event like never before.

 

Can you spot the exponential growth?

 

warmest-august-in-136-years.gif?w=577&h=

 

If that's the bottom of an exponential bell curve, and it sure as hell looks like one. HUMAN life will be potentially gone by 2030.


Edited by relaxxx, October 28 2016 - 02:28 AM.


#3 morrow

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Posted October 28 2016 - 02:34 AM

https://www.theguard...irdwatch-survey

#4 OldDude2

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Posted October 28 2016 - 03:04 AM

They also predicted we would run out of oil by 2010.
Not to mention the world would be getting much hotter (it's actually got a bit cooler)
And before that in the 1970s they predicted a coming ice age (it got a bit warmer)
In 1990 they predicted 50% of us would have HIV by now ... then BSE, Avian flu, swine flu, etc.
There's money and power to be made in scaremongering. It's how your government controls you.

Anyway in 2020 I'll be 74, dead or a care home, why should I worry about what happens then?

Edited by OldDude2, October 28 2016 - 03:21 AM.

 Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.


#5 OldDude2

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Posted October 28 2016 - 03:12 AM

Can you spot the exponential growth?


Clearly you can't, unless you think 'exponential' means a change of 1c in 130 years, I think the description should be 'trivial'.
Could someone even measure to 1c accuracy in 1880?
How many samples did they take in 1880, and over what percentage of the earths surface?

Let's think about this in a scientific way,
Measuring outside temperatures in central London in 1880,
Then cut all the trees down and concrete all over the 100 surrounding miles.
I'm surprised it isn't measuring 10c hotter in 2010.

Edited by OldDude2, October 28 2016 - 03:23 AM.

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 Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.


#6 Asmo

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Posted October 28 2016 - 04:53 AM

Meanwhile the local deer, raccoons, and coyotes around here are booming out of control. Any animal species that can learn to leach off human stupidity will do alright. Well, until we finish the planet off for human life. Which is looking to be a lot sooner than most people think. 

 

 

I don't think this thread is about those animals who actually can thrive near humans.

 

It's like watching a meadow full of grass and nettles and conclude well this field is full with plants. Nothing wrong here. 

 

Sure the world will keep turning without elephants, rhinos, tigers etc. But does the existence of these species really mean nothing? There's no inevitable need for them to go extinct yet humans will cause them to be in the near future. And those are animals that technically can be missed (although it will probably impact the ecosystems they are in to some extent), but what about certain insects which will impact the amount of birds, and plants. Just one example. Does human agrarian monoculture, heavy industry and intensive farming really excuse all these consequences? And with those animals on top of the food chain like elephants, rhinos etc.: they are for a large part the victim of poverty in Africa and superstition in Asia. Even more unnecessary and sad.


Posted Image


#7 The Walking Dickhead

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Posted October 28 2016 - 05:44 AM

 

No shortage of birds round where I live. In the city they are declining, but this ain't the city.



#8 relaxxx

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Posted October 28 2016 - 05:54 AM

Clearly you can't, unless you think 'exponential' means a change of 1c in 130 years, I think the description should be 'trivial'.
Could someone even measure to 1c accuracy in 1880?
How many samples did they take in 1880, and over what percentage of the earths surface?

Let's think about this in a scientific way,
Measuring outside temperatures in central London in 1880,
Then cut all the trees down and concrete all over the 100 surrounding miles.
I'm surprised it isn't measuring 10c hotter in 2010.

 

LOL, is there a dome over London that I'm unaware of? Your excuses show zero real world understanding. The "curve" doesn't even take off until after the 1940's. You can live in denial all you want but I'll be watching to see what 2017 reaches. If the TA hits 2.2 degrees, you can just continue to believe that we're not the least bit fucked.  


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#9 penguinsfan13

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Posted October 28 2016 - 05:55 AM

They also predicted we would run out of oil by 2010.Not to mention the world would be getting much hotter (it's actually got a bit cooler)And before that in the 1970s they predicted a coming ice age (it got a bit warmer)In 1990 they predicted 50% of us would have HIV by now ... then BSE, Avian flu, swine flu, etc.There's money and power to be made in scaremongering. It's how your government controls you.Anyway in 2020 I'll be 74, dead or a care home, why should I worry about what happens then?


You forgot that in 83 they were predicting that in 10 years north America would be overrun by bees....damn were they wrong on that one.
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doo be doo be doo, beware of the penguins.


#10 OldDude2

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Posted October 28 2016 - 06:01 AM

Your excuses show zero real world understanding.


At least I know what 'exponential' means.

 Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.