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What Do You Think Of A New Age Grunge Style Of Music

Grunge Rock Grunge Music



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#21 neonspectraltoast

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Posted December 29 2015 - 10:53 AM

Grunge never had any distinctive characteristics because, like punk and rock and roll in general, it was a label given to an explosion of individualism.  When music becomes elitist, it is no longer the highest art form.  It's just the proverbial plug stuck up the artists' ass.



#22 Theprodu

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Posted December 29 2015 - 12:03 PM

Grunge never had any distinctive characteristics because, like punk and rock and roll in general, it was a label given to an explosion of individualism.  When music becomes elitist, it is no longer the highest art form.  It's just the proverbial plug stuck up the artists' ass.

What was so individual about it?  What music do you call elitist?



#23 Reverand JC

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Posted December 29 2015 - 12:05 PM

Everyone did go nuts for Nevermind, one of those times when everyone you knew was playing the same album for a period of about 6 months or so

Mediocre song writing skills?, album was full of catchy tunes, all of which Im totally sick of now...but back in the day.....

Anyhoo, "Grunge" was pretty much only one album by one band

 

Every Nirvana tune in a nutshell:

 

Mumbled verse in Eminor

 

Screamed Chorus in GMajor

 

Add some references to disease, guns and depression in the lyrics.

 

Read this genius couplet out loud and see how much sense it makes:

 

"Load up on guns and bring your friends,

It's fun to lose and to pretend,

I'm overboard,

And self assured,

Oh no I know a dirty word."

 

I could go on and on about this drivel.

 

I think Nirvana would have just been a footnote if Cobain didn't paint the walls with his brains.

 

C/S,

Rev J


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#24 Theprodu

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Posted December 29 2015 - 12:06 PM

Lol, seems like you're the one with disdain for a certain art form here. 

Oh, you're a perceptive one!

 

I wouldn't call it an art form though, just bad pop music.



#25 neonspectraltoast

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Posted December 29 2015 - 03:06 PM

 

 

What was so individual about it?  What music do you call elitist?

 

I think maybe you guys perceive grunge as being some form of music.  In my mind, it more refers to the scene at the time, though we can split hairs about that, I suppose.  Beck was a part of that scene.  Weezer was a part of that scene.  Green Day was a part of that scene.  Hell, even the Cranberries were a part of that scene.  There was no formula.  And most of the bands didn't think of themselves as grunge.  Nirvana thought of themselves as a punk band.  So criticize NIrvana for being simplistic, but they weren't trying to be musical geniuses.  Some people call them musical geniuses.  Maybe they are right.  Maybe they are wrong.  

 

Like Nirvana or not, whatever.  If you want to, deny that the scene was defined by the label "grunge."  Okay.  But the scene did exist, and as far as the scene goes, it was unified, and it wasn't unified by any one particular style of music.  There were punk bands, there were folk artists, there were industrial bands breaking new ground. 

I call it elitist when someone likes a particular style of music, so they lump everything else in a category of "not really being music."  I hate Nickelback, but I won't seriously accuse them of not being, technically, music.  What is music if not something that frees the spirit, and who is to say whose spirit can be freed by what?  Okay, so we're all guilty of having various degrees of intelligence and various different bands will be able to liberate us depending on what our intelligence level may be.  Some artists are for dumb people, and some artists are for really smart people.  So I'll admit, maybe I'm dumber than you for liking Nirvana, a lot, which I do, but it's what gets my creative juices flowing.  If Nirvana was really good at promoting individuality, which I think they were, Kurt Cobain was a fierce individualist, then I think their music was really good at freeing people's spirits, which is what good music does, and which is probably why people call them musical geniuses.  

 

Even if you have
Even if you need
I don't mean to stare
We don't have to breed
We could plant a house
We could build a tree
I don't even care
We could have all three

 

INDIVIDUALITY.  That was the message.  That's what people were excited about at the time.  Though yeah, we can get into whether technically that's what we're talking about when we're talking about grunge.  But to speak of "grunge" in terms of a particular formula of music and forget about what the scene was really like at the time is a disservice.  


Edited by neonspectraltoast, December 29 2015 - 03:08 PM.


#26 Theprodu

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Posted December 29 2015 - 03:31 PM

I just never got into the 'attitude' part of any music scene. I didn't listen to rock music to piss off my parents or as a protest on greater society, or as a release of teen angst. (In fact I rarely paid any attention to the content of rock lyrics, just the melody and syllabic cadence) I just liked the music. And when rock music seemed to become more about attitude than musical substance...well, that turned me off. Punk music I was like, ok, whatever, these guys don't care about sounding good, they prefer to sound offensive. But the new punk and grunge made a slicker form of mainstream 'punk', and ended up crucified by their peers when they made it big. Ha, they became the rockstars they once hated! Ain't karma a bitch



#27 Guest_xenxan

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Posted December 29 2015 - 04:50 PM

I think maybe you guys perceive grunge as being some form of music.  In my mind, it more refers to the scene at the time, though we can split hairs about that, I suppose.  Beck was a part of that scene.  Weezer was a part of that scene.  Green Day was a part of that scene.  Hell, even the Cranberries were a part of that scene.  There was no formula.  And most of the bands didn't think of themselves as grunge.  Nirvana thought of themselves as a punk band.  So criticize NIrvana for being simplistic, but they weren't trying to be musical geniuses.  Some people call them musical geniuses.  Maybe they are right.  Maybe they are wrong.  

 

Like Nirvana or not, whatever.  If you want to, deny that the scene was defined by the label "grunge."  Okay.  But the scene did exist, and as far as the scene goes, it was unified, and it wasn't unified by any one particular style of music.  There were punk bands, there were folk artists, there were industrial bands breaking new ground. 

I call it elitist when someone likes a particular style of music, so they lump everything else in a category of "not really being music."  I hate Nickelback, but I won't seriously accuse them of not being, technically, music.  What is music if not something that frees the spirit, and who is to say whose spirit can be freed by what?  Okay, so we're all guilty of having various degrees of intelligence and various different bands will be able to liberate us depending on what our intelligence level may be.  Some artists are for dumb people, and some artists are for really smart people.  So I'll admit, maybe I'm dumber than you for liking Nirvana, a lot, which I do, but it's what gets my creative juices flowing.  If Nirvana was really good at promoting individuality, which I think they were, Kurt Cobain was a fierce individualist, then I think their music was really good at freeing people's spirits, which is what good music does, and which is probably why people call them musical geniuses.  

 

Even if you have
Even if you need
I don't mean to stare
We don't have to breed
We could plant a house
We could build a tree
I don't even care
We could have all three

 

INDIVIDUALITY.  That was the message.  That's what people were excited about at the time.  Though yeah, we can get into whether technically that's what we're talking about when we're talking about grunge.  But to speak of "grunge" in terms of a particular formula of music and forget about what the scene was really like at the time is a disservice.  

 

The last statement paints it perfectly.

 

Personally, Nirvana were overrated. I never did take to them. Although I was and still am a big fan of Soundgarden, who kind of sailed under the radar in the early days; even to a point where Chris Cornell rarely gets any or very little credit as one of the best singer songwriters then and now.

 

"Grunge" always seem to be the combination of Punk, ala Black Flag: SamHain: Misfits and of the Heavier sounds of Sabbath:Saxon and Zep.

 

Like Toast says, 'Grunge' was and still is the identity of the times.

 

Now music just plain isn't there. Too many one and done. Make a quick buck, find someone younger, more obscene to replace the last. Talent is no longer part of or required in the music industry today.



#28 Theprodu

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Posted December 29 2015 - 05:24 PM

I like Cornell.


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#29 Asmo

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Posted December 30 2015 - 05:16 AM

I prefer Nevermind above Soundgarden, most of Pearl Jam and basically everything else that is considered grunge. But the album kind of grew on me and grunge is not spend well on me at all anyway. Just because it makes use of simple formulas and techniques doesn't make the songs less great (some would argue that it's on the contrary :P) and it also doesn't make the musicians involved untalented. Like Neonspectraltoast says: they really weren't trying to be musical geniuses. Hey maybe they were trying to make it big (as opposed to their or Cobain's image I guess) but they were doing it in their own way in their own unique style that sounded new and refreshing at the time and lots of people loved it (and apparently still do).



#30 Theprodu

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Posted December 30 2015 - 06:47 AM

I prefer Nevermind  Hey maybe they were trying to make it big (as opposed to their or Cobain's image I guess) but they were doing it in their own way in their own unique style that sounded new and refreshing at the time and lots of people loved it (and apparently still do).

Riiight...hate to pop your fantasy but...

 

 

wiki

Nevermind became a huge commercial success, selling millions of copies and popularizing the Seattle grunge movement and alternative rock in general.[4] However, all three members of Nirvana—singer and guitarist Kurt Cobain, bassist Krist Novoselic, and drummer Dave Grohl—later expressed dissatisfaction with the sound of the album, citing its production as too polished.

 

Early in 1992, Cobain told Rolling Stone that he was sure that the band's next album would showcase "both of the extremes" of its sound, saying "it'll be more raw with some songs and more candy pop on some of the others. It won't be as one-dimensional [as Nevermind]".

 

Nirvana ultimately chose Albini to record its third album

Although he considered the group to be "R.E.M. with a fuzzbox" and "an unremarkable version of the Seattle sound", Albini told Nirvana biographer Michael Azerrad he accepted because he felt sorry for the band members, whom he perceived to be "the same sort of people as all the small-fry bands I deal with", at the mercy of their record company.

Albini instituted a strict policy of ignoring everyone except for the band members; the producer explained that everyone associated with the group aside from the musicians themselves were "the biggest pieces of shit I ever met"

 

Cobain originally wanted to name the album I Hate Myself and I Want to Die, a phrase that had originated in his journals in mid-1992. At the time, the singer used the phrase as a response whenever someone asked him how he was doing. Cobain intended the album title as a joke; he stated he was "tired of taking this band so seriously and everyone else taking it so seriously"

 

 

Cobain was obviously a fucking puke, and not only didn't care about quality or musicianship, didn't care about the band. He wasn't being an individual, he was just a fucked up kid throwing a temper tantrum, you could hear it in his voice, you could see it in his demeanor. And all his fans could relate with that apparently. It's just sickening


Edited by Theprodu, December 30 2015 - 06:47 AM.






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