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Why Is Art Important?




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#21 RichardTheFrog

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Posted November 16 2014 - 04:12 PM

Why would she have to choose which one is more valuable?
Your intention is to make a point that science is more important and useful.

 

No, it wasn't.



#22 Dancing in the Mists

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Posted November 16 2014 - 04:31 PM

What is the meaning of a poem for example? Like Robert Frost "The Road Less Travelled"....

 

it means that sometimes it's good to take the lesser travelled route, right?

 

So I get it too, don't I?

 

 

Assuming you mean Frost's "The Road Not Taken," this is one of the most frequently misunderstood and misinterpreted poems. If you actually read the poem, in the fourth stanza, he looks back upon his decision with a sigh. This sigh is most likely one of regret. 

 

 

Why is art important?

 

I'm a science guy.

 

I read history books and when it comes to the art section of each chapter, I don't entirely see the point.

 

Gothic cathedrals, Michaelangelo, architecture, Shakespeare, etc.

 

How is this relevant and important?

 

I'm not saying that it's not. I am just asking if there is something that I'm missing.

 

If you actually study art history, you will find that a lot of art is relevant to social movements. There are so many hidden political messages within impressionism and modernism. The creation of art is an effective way to convey a message without just blathering about it. Look at Gustave Courbet's piece "The Stonebreakers." Painted in 1845, it was revolutionary really. In a time when most art was created in the style of the salon portraying relaxing and pretty images, Courbet made a statement about the plight of the poor. The image is almost violent with the hammers, and it came shortly before the French revolution. Viewers found it to be remarkably uncomfortable. At the time, it was not very well received, and now it is an exceptionally important piece of art history.

 

Contemporary art is more difficult to understand. Pieces may still make statements, but often, the pieces are selling the artist's ideas rather than technical skill. As a meticulous artist myself, I struggle with this. I highly value craftsmanship, and if I have an idea, statement, emotion, etc that I want to convey, I am going to do it to the best of my ability. 


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#23 RichardTheFrog

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Posted November 16 2014 - 04:49 PM

Assuming you mean Frost's "The Road Not Taken," this is one of the most frequently misunderstood and misinterpreted poems. If you actually read the poem, in the fourth stanza, he looks back upon his decision with a sigh. This sigh is most likely one of regret. 

 

 

 

If you actually study art history, you will find that a lot of art is relevant to social movements. There are so many hidden political messages within impressionism and modernism. The creation of art is an effective way to convey a message without just blathering about it. Look at Gustave Courbet's piece "The Stonebreakers." Painted in 1845, it was revolutionary really. In a time when most art was created in the style of the salon portraying relaxing and pretty images, Courbet made a statement about the plight of the poor. The image is almost violent with the hammers, and it came shortly before the French revolution. Viewers found it to be remarkably uncomfortable. At the time, it was not very well received, and now it is an exceptionally important piece of art history.

 

Contemporary art is more difficult to understand. Pieces may still make statements, but often, the pieces are selling the artist's ideas rather than technical skill. As a meticulous artist myself, I struggle with this. I highly value craftsmanship, and if I have an idea, statement, emotion, etc that I want to convey, I am going to do it to the best of my ability. 

 

That makes sense. Other than the fact that the French Revolution was in 1789.

 

You're probably referring to the revolutions that occurred throughout central Europe in 1848.



#24 Dancing in the Mists

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:12 PM

That makes sense. Other than the fact that the French Revolution was in 1789.

 

You're probably referring to the revolutions that occurred throughout central Europe in 1848.

 

The one most referred to was from 1789-1799 I believe, but France had more than one revolution. The one I am referring to specifically is sometimes call the "February Revolution" or the French Revolution of 1848.


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#25 RichardTheFrog

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:19 PM

Well alright then. But if you're going to say "The French Revolution," then obviously people are going to think of the big one with Marie Antionette followed by all that Napoleon stuff.


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#26 Dancing in the Mists

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:24 PM

It would seem so. That's why I didn't capitalize "the" or "revolution," but I should have been more specific.


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#27 RichardTheFrog

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:28 PM

It would seem so. That's why I didn't capitalize "the" or "revolution," but I should have been more specific.

 

You work in mysterious ways.



#28 Dancing in the Mists

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:32 PM

I'm a stickler for proper capitalization, so when I don't, it's a big deal to me. I forget that most people are not as obsessive as I am!


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#29 Meliai

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:33 PM

the thought of a world without art seems really barren to me.


Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens ~Tolkien


#30 RichardTheFrog

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Posted November 16 2014 - 05:58 PM

I'm a stickler for proper capitalization, so when I don't, it's a big deal to me. I forget that most people are not as obsessive as I am!

 

I bet you're a stickler for a lot of things.






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