Will BioMetals Support Astronauts in Space?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Friar Turk, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. Friar Turk

    Friar Turk Dankin' and Tankin'

  2. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    That's just the tip of the iceberg. Part of the problem, for example, is the human body relies on resonance. Proteins ring like a bell to speed up their ability to fold and there are other indications that topological functions in the body often rely on gravity to work correctly. However, we don't even know if humans can survive for long periods in Martian gravity, and research like this might make the difference, even if spaceships have to be rotated to simulate gravity.

    The astronauts have experience a wide variety of different physiological problems and it is simply becoming apparent zero g is bad for the human body in so many ways they can hardly keep track of them all. Like ionizing radiation, it is obvious they will have to eliminate the problem altogether, as best they can, by rotating space ships and using active shielding. Both are technologies that are only now being introduced and, like deep sea diving, will likely require many decades just to get all the fundamentals down.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
    Friar Turk likes this.
  3. Irminsul

    Irminsul Valkyrie

    I never underwood how if a planet has so much gravity it could squash you then why are they making mechanical warriors that weigh 30 tonnes GP out on that planet and like wouldn't they just become 300ton road blocks that can't move lol?
     
    Friar Turk likes this.
  4. Friar Turk

    Friar Turk Dankin' and Tankin'

    With astronaut navigation lasting for long duration flight on both the Russian Mir and the Multi-National ISS there is a clear path to habitable domain on the Fourth Planet Mars.
     
  5. wooleeheron

    wooleeheron Brain Damaged Lifetime Supporter HipForums Supporter

    That's like saying we can inhabit the bottom of the ocean. Yeah, people can survive in orbit for a few months, but much past a year and they start to fall apart physically. There's no point in sending human beings when a robot can do the same job much cheaper and nobody gets hurt. We still don't know if anyone can live in Martian gravity for any length of time.
     
  6. Friar Turk

    Friar Turk Dankin' and Tankin'

    YOU HAVE GOT TO BE AN ALIEN. CONGRATULATIONS. YOUR IN DEBT.
     

Share This Page