Royal Rank.

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Jimbee68, Jul 6, 2024.

  1. Jimbee68

    Jimbee68 Member

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    By the Dark Ages, it was important to know the social order of things. And so they came up with the following order. A king outranks a prince, a prince outranks a duke and a duke outranks someone like a baron. (Emperors outrank all of them. But that's another story.)

    Some people think Queen Elizabeth II was the queen of England and the United Kingdom. That's actually not correct. She was king. Because king always outranks a queen. Just like king outranks a prince and a prince outranks a duke.

    Now, the mother of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, was what you would call a true queen. In other words, a queen consort, or the wife of a king. Actually, though, to be technical, a queen consort is a prince/ss. Or, in other words, just below a king in rank, as I said.
     
  2. Jimbee68

    Jimbee68 Member

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    Also, people say the king of England has no real power or authority. He has a lot authority. He is the head of state. And the head of state outranks even the prime minister, who is the head of government. (Whether or not the king of the UK has no powers is debatable too. More on that below.)

    The head of state represents that country on the world stage. He is their official ambassador. And supposedly has all the real authority. Though in places like the UK, King Charles's powers are now limited. Because they are a constitutional monarchy now.

    In the United States, the president is both the head of government and the head of state. Which is unusual. We are the only country that does that now. And as for the king of England having no real power. He has a lot of powers. They are called residual powers. He signs bills to become law, much like our president does. He could veto if he wanted. (Though the last British monarch to exercise that power was Queen Anne in the 1700's.) He has the sole power to pardon. Though prime minister usually will recommend who should be pardoned now. He opens and dissolves sessions of parliament. They can't conduct business unless he does. Though he always does, of course. The people of England don't vote in the prime minister. Well, actually they do. But then the king appoints him. The king of England is technically the one who appoints the prime minister there. Just like the electoral college in the United States is technically who votes for the president. But the king of England always respects the will of the people. Of course. The king also knights people who then become members of the House of Lords. The House of Lords is the highest court of appeals there, kind of like our Supreme Court. So like president of the United States appointing members to the US Supreme Court, the king can shape policy for many years to come that way. (Though now the prime minister again is usually the person who recommends who is knighted to serve in the House of Lords.)

    Also, you know power and authority are not the same thing. The treasurer of the United States has very little power now they say. That position was created in 1777 by the US Continental Congress. But now most of those original duties and responsibilities are covered by the Secretary of the Treasury. The powers of the treasurer are largely symbolic now, they say. But they do still have power. They sign our money. Their signature is first, on the lower left side. And then the Secretary of the Treasury has his signature on the right. Because the treasurer still outranks him to this day.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2024

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