Recommended Artists

Discussion in 'Music' started by boothy, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    Right, as an idea for a productive thread, here goes :)

    I thought if we had a thread where we do profiles on reccomened bands, any genre. Things you should include: Denre, recommended songs/albums, year of debut, profile, images of band/albums... although it's not a must good spelling and grammer would help a lot.

    I will edit this post with a list of who has already been done, no point doing an artist twice!

    Please try to keep the non-band profile replies to a minumum, if you have any questions, please feel welcome to PM me :)

    Right, let's start an ultimate artist thread!

    EDIT: Wow, good word you lot, I was writing my U2 thread, lookedback at already had a few articles :) Keep 'em coming!

    Here's the list:

    The Grateful Dead
    The Flaming Lips
    The Stone Roses
    Mindless Self Indulgence
    U2
    Grant Green
    Bob Marley
    Beck
    The Libertines
    Jimmy Cliff
    The Beatles
    Allman Brothers Band
    Tim Buckley
    Jeff Buckley
    Yes
    The Levellers

    EDIT: Sorry I should have mentioned this before you all contributed: could you turn you signature off for posts in this thread, for better viewing I guess... to do this (if you have already posted) go to "edit" and un-check "show signature"... do the same if you are replying... cheers!
     
  2. alice_d_millionaire

    alice_d_millionaire Just Do It©

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    the Grateful Dead.

    Formed: 1965 in San Francisco, California
    Years Active: 1965 through 1995
    Group's Main Members: Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Ron "Pigpen"McKernan (dead), Bill Kreutzmann, Micky Hart, Keith (dead) & Donna Godcheaux, Brent Mydland (dead)

    "What a long, strange trip it's been" is a lyric from one of the Grateful Dead's best known songs and pretty much tells a bunch about the long history of this band. The earliest traces of the band began in 1960 when band founder and leader Jerry Garcia met Robert Hunter who would become the band's main lyrics man. The Dead evolved in 1964 from Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions which featured Garcia on banjo and guitar along with guitarist Bob Weir and keyboardist Ron "Pigpen" McKernan. They played mainly folk and bluegrass music In 1965, the group was renamed the Warlocks and now included Phil Lesh on bass and Bill Kreutzmann on the drums.They first started to be noticed at Ken Kesey's Acid Tests where they were the house band. The Acid Test were a series of now-legendary public LSD parties (documented in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test), where Stanley Owsley manufactured the then legal LSD and plied the band and party goers with copious amounts of the drug.

    By the end of '65 the band changed their name to the Grateful Dead and they were all living in a communal house situated at 710 Ashbury Street in San Francisco.They started to build a large following with their free concerts and were considered amongst the leaders of the then growing hippie movement in San Francisco. In 1966 they signed with MGM Records but the resulting recording sessions didn't go well and the label dropped the group a short time later.With 1967 came the Summer Of Love and the Dead were the top draw at the Fillmore Auditorium and other local venues. Also in '67 they would release their self-titled debut album for Warner Bros but it wasn' well received. Even very early on for the Dead it seemed that live shows were their bag and the studio work almost a secondly thing. After the Monterey Pop Festival that year the Dead added a second drummer, Micky Hart. In 1968 their second album Anthem Of The Sun was much better received. The album was recorded both in the studio playing 'live' and also at 17 different concerts. In late 1969 the Dead would put out their first true live album Live Dead, which came after their third studio album Aoxomoxoa, released in early '69, had put them in deep debt to their label. Live Dead was their first true great album. The song "Dark Star" set the pace, clocking in at 23 minutes with some great playing from Garcia and the rest of the band. This album showed what the band was truly all about, unlike what was heard on the previous studio albums. 1970 would see the release of two studio companion albums Workingman's Dead and American Beauty. Both albums would become classics, containing songs like "Casey Jones" and "Truckin" and finally the band had a good feel of how to go about it in the studio. Yet their next two albums would be live ones, 1971's double album The Grateful Dead [1971] (which ended up with the same title as their debut album after Warner would not let then release it under the title they wanted, "Skull Fuck"), and the 1972 triple album, Europe '72. Guess it made sense that the Dead would release these live sets at this time. Even though they were getting plenty of FM air time with their latest studio albums, they still considered themselves a live act first and the new merging masses of Deadheads across the USA were becoming as big as the bands' live shows.

    Europe '72 would be the last album to feature Pigpen. His health had been deteriorating steady for the last couple of years from heavy drinking and sadly he passed away in 1973 of liver failure. He was replaced on keyboards by Keith Godcheaux and at the same time his wife Donna joined the band on vocals. Also in '73 was the release of their album Wake Of The Flood which was a commercial success. The Dead would end up releasing ten albums in the 70s ending with 1978's Shakedown Street which was produced by Lowell George. At the end of 1979 the Godcheauxs were ask to leave the band as they just didn't seem to fit in to the band's plans. The following year Keith would be killed in a car crash. In 1980 their new album Go To Heaven was released with new keyboard player Brent Mydland. Although the album was considered a disappointment to many Deadheads, it contain the band's first hit single "Alabama Getaway", but a "pop" album was not what the masses wanted.

    The decade of the 80s would prove a tough time for the Dead with Garcia's heroin problem starting to take control. In fact from '81's live album Dead Set they would not have another release for six years. They instead kept touring to sold out shows that now spanned generations of fans. In 1986 Garcia collapsed and came close to death when he went into a diabetic coma. After that a cleaner Garcia emerged and in '87 a surprise would be found on their new release In The Dark. The Dead were still considered a cult phenomenon prior to its release. But one song in particular "Touch of Grey" along with its video became a worldwide Top Ten hit, their first, and now even more new fans flocked to the group. Hunter's lyrics were just perfect for Garcia and his now aging image: "Oh well a touch of grey, kinda suits you anyway" and "I will survive". The song seem to put a smile on everybody's face, even the Deadheads loved it and didn't mind the fact it was a mainstream hit.

    But the success of "Touch of Grey" would not last, as far as future studio albums and the band's health went. They released Built To Last in 1989 which would receive poor reviews and would turn out to be their last studio album. Problems were also now showing up at live shows for the Deadheads. Clashes with the police and two fan deaths (one while in police custody)in one month alone. Then in 1990 death would hit the band again when Mydland would die of a drug overdose, the third keyboard player to die in the band. Bruce Hornsby and then Vince Welnick would take over the keyboards for the band after that. In 1992 Garcia was again hospitalized with diabetes and an enlarged heart, forcing the Dead to postpone their upcoming tour. The band did come back after that to tour and Garcia looked better. But on August 9, 1995 the Dead came to an end when Garcia was found dead in bed in a drug treatment center he had just entered. His death was as much an important ending in music as was the breakup of the Beatles in 1970. With Garcia's and the Dead's passing, things in hippieland will never quite be the same again.

    reccomended albums -
    *american beauty (of course) - a varitable greatest hits compilation... has 'truckin' on it, which is a song that all the non-deadheads probably know.
    *live/dead - stellar patchwork of live performances from some time in 1969... great energy... contains 'dark star' saint stephen' and 'turn on your lovelight'... three essential dead tunes.
    *wake of the flood - great songwriting and all around musicianship... what can i say.

    reccomended downloads -
    a body can find some awesome GD downloads at www.archive.org, they do have over 2000 shows to choose from. so heres the ones i reccomend:
    *5-19-66 avalon ballroom or 11-19-66 at the fillmore
    *1-22-68 eagle's auditorium
    *5-14-70 meramec community college
    *3-24-71 winterland
    my forte is kinda the old school stuff, im sure someone could elaborate on the latter day stuff, but i do reccomend purchasing the 'closing of winterland' dvd...

    bio taken from http://www.keno.org/classic_rock/grateful_dead_bio.htm
     
  3. dedhead95

    dedhead95 The Wizard of Rhythm

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    Artist: The Flaming Lips

    Genre:psychedelic, Alternative, Experimental

    Members(current): Wayne Coyne, Steven Drozd, Michael Ivins

    Recommended Albums
    "Clouds Taste Metallic" (1995)
    "Transmissions From the Satellite Heart" (1993)
    "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" (2002)

    Recommended Songs:
    "Turn it On"
    "Brainville"
    "Fight Test"
    "She Dont Use Jelly"

    [​IMG]
    THE FLAMING LIPS
    http://www.flaminglips.com/main.php
     
  4. Oz!

    Oz! Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

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    I do a bit of this stuff for a music board I'm on :)

    THE STONE ROSES

    There are three reasons I love these guys –
    They were arrogant, supremely arrogant, but they were good and in the self-depreciating days of the late eighties/early nineties their attitude was refreshing.
    They smacked of genius. Their music is staggering in it’s originality and, oddly, in many ways it’s conformity. Yet they still achieved a perfect style for those days. A mix of pop, rock and dance that has never been matched. Their music influenced such act as The Happy Mondays, The Inspiral Carpets and The Charlatans. They gave birth to the whole Madchester scene which spawned so much great music.
    They pushed Morrisey and other whingers of his ilk away from the limelight. That in itself should put them on a pedestal that can never be toppled.

    Why write a review of a band that is no more?
    Their recordings still sound as fresh as ever. There is a whole new up and coming generation that don’t know the work of these guys. It would be a criminal act not to point them in their direction.

    I’m sitting comfortably, tell me about them
    The Stone Roses Career was short (1987 –1996). You won’t find tales of a self destructive drink and booze fuelled lifestyle in their history, nor will you find immense in-band fighting, although you will find the odd squabble. Their history is a good old fashioned tale of being fucked over by the recording industry and genuine bad luck.
    The band signed with Thinline Records in 1987 and release their 12” single Tell Me. A catchy enough tune, although it their sound was still very amateur, the singer had yet to find his “voice” and although he made a commendable effort, he still sounded young and very inexperienced, the music, filled with catchy guitar riffs sounded a lil’ slapdash and had a quickly-put-together feel. For reasons not recorded, although I suspect it had a lot to do with free beer and a gentle massaging of the bands ego’s, they switched to FM Revolver where they released their second single, Sally Cinnamon. This was a turning point, the song still sounds remarkable today, the singer had found his voice and guitar work was clean, sharp and sprightly. It also showed an underlying songwriting talent the band would thrive on. Sally Cinnamon sounds for all the world like a stock pop song, and musically it is, bright, lively without being over complicated and containing a huge “feelgood” factor. Only when the singer delivers the final verse do we realise that the song has a somewhat remorsefull edge. This was something new, pop conformity that threw in a twist. People began to listen.
    The band quickly grew frustrated with small label FM Records, who seemed to favour caution releasing their work on a national scale and after a bitter argument they parted company and signed to Silvertone in 1989. Their debut single with the label, Elephant Stone, shifted away from their pop roots and mixed psychedelic rock guitar work, the popular acid house drum and bass work and melodious vocals to create a new sound. On paper this eclectic mix of old guitar, ultra modern rhythm sections and tunefull singing looked impossible to pull off. But, the lads made it work, and it worked well.
    The music press soon took notice and their sound was touted as “the next big thing”. Their self titled debut album proved it was. Musically it combined many standards of pop. Easily accessable tunes, funk or rock tracks that simply delivered. Some tracks containing that dark lyrical twist that they excel at, others, simply good simple tunes. The album also threw in a couple of surprises. Don’t Stop is simply the song Waterfall with the drum and bass played forward but the guitars played backwards and new lyrics simply imposed over the track, sounds daft? Yup, but it works. Elizabeth My Dear is an anti-royalist song, sang over an only slightly altered rendition of Scarborough fair. The whole album looked, felt and sounded “new” something different but not alien. And my gods, we loved it.
    Then, the arguments started. The band fought with Silvertone over royalty payments. The fight would continue for the next five years, despite a second (and excellent) album Turns into Stone) being released in the meantime this fighting crippled a great deal of the bands creativity. After long, lengthy and expensive fighting with Silvertone the band finally split from the label in 1995 and signed with Geffen Records. Their only release on the label, the album Second Coming, was mostly ignored. Grunge had arrived from America and the brit teens were thrilling to boy bands like Take That and Boyzone. The album, in my opinion, contains some classic tracks but also some desperate ones. Looking to a more rock feel the band had turned it’s back on it’s pop roots and the 11 min long Jimmy Page like track Break Right into Heaven was so far out of the Stone Roses character that you could almost feel it was their swansong. Listening to the album you could almost feel, musically at least, that the band were heading in very different directions as individuals.
    Then the bad luck arrived. The drummer quit the band (replaced by ex-Rebel MC drummer Robbie Maddix). A successful tour of the US ended with the guitarist breaking his collarbone thus forcing the band to cancel a headlining spot at Glastonbury Festival in the UK. This performance was to be hailed as their big comeback. Maybe the misfortune was the straw that broke the camels back, maybe their ego’s had just become to large to share stage space. No one knows. What is known is that by 1996 it was all over. After just three brilliant albums the Stone Roses called it a day.

    So who were they?
    Jon Squire – Guitars
    Ian Brown – Vocals
    Alan “Reni” Wren – Bass
    Gary “Mani” Mountfield – Drums

    What did they play?
    An eclectic mix that worked. Pure pop songs, great funk, psychedelic rock, and a few tracks that owe a lot to good ol’ fashioned rock and roll. Pleasant, rarely aggressive vocals mix with bright guitarwork but the powerhouse of the group is the genius of Reni and Mani on bass and drums respectively. Creative and new rhythm’s played by two real artists.
    Lyrically the songs were magnificent. Pop anthems that only revealed a dark side when listened to with care. Political protest songs, often done in a pop or funk style ranging from recounts of rioting French students to the struggle against segregation in the US. Simple lovesongs and songs about revenge on a betraying lover abound. There is a lot of variety in their writing skills.
    Their overall sound was simplistic, going back to the grassroots of a band. Drummer, bass, guitars and vocals. At the end of the eighties a lot of us were thoroughly tired of the mechanical twaddle spewed out by endless new romantic bands and the Stone Roses were fiercely anti-technology (in a famous incident Jon Squire was given a synth-drum machine to experiment with by his producer. He twiddled with it for a few hours, proclaimed that it wasn't music, it was computer programming. He then smashed the machine to tiny pieces, scraped up the bits, took them home, turned them into a piece of artwork and presented the sculpture to the producer the next day).
    This is good honest simple music. The album you play when sitting with a group of friends and need something to relax the atmosphere or when you find yourself alone on a Sunday afternoon, had a night of great sex or are waiting for the ecstasy tab to slowly wear off. It’s music that puts you in a relaxed frame of mind, but keeps you thinking and being surprised enough to realise that planet earth is a pretty cool place afterall.

    Hmm, will I like them?
    Tis all a matter of taste, as with all music. If your Mettalica Black album is framed on your wall or if you jump around to the lively bollocks that is Limp Bizkitt (or wotever the fuck they are called) then you are going to hate the Stone Roses. If you have thrilled at George Harrisons guitar, sat fascinated at the Verve’s lyrics or enjoyed Mick Jaggers audacity on record, then you might enjoy them.

    Were they any good live?
    No. They weren’t. Despite drawing a 30,000 crowd at their now infamous Spike Island (a former dumping ground for chemical waste) gig. They were continually dogged by bad luck when playing live. Dodgy sound equipment, irate fans (Brown, inspired by reading of the French student riots in the 60’s used to tell his audience that sucking a lemon was proof against teargas, several times fans tested his theory by setting off tear gas grenades at concerts), and, to be brutally honest, Brown could rarely hold it together singing live, often slipping out of tune. A few of their better gigs survive, and are available on dvd (but I ain’t bothered with them, so have no new info)

    What should I buy? Only three albums but which one?
    Six albums actually. Two compilations and a collection of remixes (which is excellent)
    I’d suggest two purchases Their self titled debut album and the compilation The Complete Stone Roses. In fact, if you don’t already own these discs then I strongly suspect that your father was a hamster and your mother smelled of elderberries.

    So they came, they shone like a star……but where are they now?
    John Squire went on to form the Seahorses (Don’t take a genius to figure out that is an anagram of She’s a Rose). They made one brilliant album then self destructed, the former vocalist proclaiming the Squire “is the devil himself”. Squire is currently working solo with one solo album and a couple of tours under his belt.
    Ian Brown is currently enjoying successful solo career and collaborating with other bands as the whim takes him.
    Reni went on to join Primal Scream. And looks as tho’ he is having the time of his life.
    Mani, I don’ know.

    Where can I find out more?
    Few bands have been discussed/analyized more than the Stone Roses. But you can find that anywhere on the ‘net and find a million different arguments. The band remain smugly silent about those days.
    For a good examination of their work, I like This site

    Any last words?
    Yup. Go listen to them, you might enjoy them and I defy anyone to listen to their back catalogue without thinking “that’s great…..but there was something else, they were on the edge of something fantastic….I wish they hadn’t split”

    Disclaimer: Facts and figures may not be accurate
     
  5. Duck

    Duck quack. Lifetime Supporter

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    Mindless Self Indulgence
    they are a very unique type of punk
    kinda electronic, very fast paced, very weird humor, very cool
    favorite line I can think of by them is in a song bitching about Jesus being the messaih and not him "My divinity has been denied,
    Mary and me were both fucked by God"
    http://www.myspace.com/mindlessselfindulgence

    Ween
    very versatile many different types of music
    they do a song on the South Park Chef Aid CD called The Homo Rainbow
    they have a kinda sick humor sometimes but are very good
    I can't really think of anyways to relaly show them off, seeing how my favorite part of their songs is the music...

    Bloodhound Gang
    I would call them 90s party rap
    it is very upbeat and such, and the lyrics are very amazing
    you might remember Fire, Water, Burn by them:
    "The roof, The roof, The roof is on fire
    We don't need no water let the mother fucker burn"
    or Bad Touch:
    "You and me baby ain't nothing but mammals
    So let's do it like they do on the Discovery channel"
    they are very underrated and very genius
    favorite lyrics by them would probably be:
    http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bloodhoundgang/thebadtouch.html
    http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bloodhoundgang/iwishiwasqueersoicouldgetchicks.html
    http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bloodhoundgang/liftyourheaduphighandblowyourbrainsout.html

    Reel Big Fish
    Very upbeat Ska
    really good music matched with pretty damn good lyrics makes this one kickass band
    they have alot of songs where they talk about very dumb philosophies but they actually make them seem somewhat reasonable, suh as a song about being alcoholic because his girl don't love him and such
    their one CD Turn Off The Radio is set up in kinda a story like way
    I like the lyrics to this song about stalking: http://www.lyricalcontent.com/htmlit.php?q=48331+Reel+Big+Fish+Skatanic

    I am being lazy right now but I will add more to each of these
     
  6. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    U2


    Genre:
    In the 80's U2 were a rock band with various influences of the past 30 years, mainly Classic Rock or punk bands influenced them most. The in the 90's they re-invented themselves, and experimented with various sounds, including more poppier sounds, and on some albums delving into what many describe as their "techno" sounds.

    Debut album:
    Boy (1981)

    Current & Original Line-up:
    Bono/Paul Heweson: Vocals
    Edge/Dave Evans: Guitar, backing vocals
    Adam Clayton: Bass Guitar
    Larry Mullen: Percussion

    Recommended albums:
    War (1983)
    The Joshua Tree (1987)
    Achtung Baby (1991)

    Profile:
    U2 first started when Larry Mullen famously placed a request for musicians on the notice board of his school in Dublin. They first gained a fanbase in Ireland, and had their first Irish number 1 in 1979. After coming over to London to secure a record deal, they finally got their break. Their first album, Boy, was a great success.

    Over the years U2 have had many hit singles and albums, with suprisingly little bad word. They have 14 studio albums under their belt. They have been very involved in numerous charities, most notable the Live8 cause.

    U2 really shine live - they are a live band through and through. I was lucky enough to see them at Cardiff millenium stadium this year, and it blew me away. bono can move a crowd amazingly well, I recommend if you ever have the chance to go to a show, to grab that opportunity.

    It seems to me many dislike U2 because of their hit singles, however the recent songs released, such as Vertigo, barely touch the surface of the greatness of U2's work. Their albums contain the reason I love U2 - their songs, are extremely powerful.

    Currently U2 are re-recording their Pop album, a mid-90's album that was consdiered one of their lesser moments.

    Images:

    The Band:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Live:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. rainbowpower

    rainbowpower Member

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    The Guess Who

    While the Guess Who did have several hits in America, they were superstars in their home country of Canada during the 1960s and early '70s. The band grew out of vocalist/guitarist Chad Allan (born Allan Kobel) and guitarist Randy Bachman's Winnipeg-based group Chad Allan and the Expressions, originally known as first the Silvertones and then the Reflections. The remainder of the lineup featured bassist Jim Kale, pianist Bob Ashley, and drummer Garry Peterson. The Expressions recorded a cover of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over" in 1965, which became a surprise hit in Canada and reached the U.S. Top 40. When the Expressions recorded an entire album of the same name, its record company, Quality, listed their name as "Guess Who?" on the jacket, hoping to fool record buyers into thinking that the British Invasion-influenced music was actually by a more famous group in disguise. Ashley had been replaced by keyboardist/vocalist Burton Cummings, who became lead vocalist when Allan departed in 1966. The Guess Who embarked on an unsuccessful tour of England and returned home to record commercials and appear on the television program Let's Go, hosted by Chad Allan. However, further American success eluded the Guess Who until the 1969 Top Ten hit "These Eyes"; the recording session for the accompanying album, Wheatfield Soul, was paid for by producer Jack Richardson, who mortgaged his house to do so. Canned Wheat Packed by the Guess Who produced three Top 40 singles later that year. In 1970, the Guess Who released the cuttingly sarcastic riff-rocker "American Woman," which, given its anti-American putdowns, ironically became their only U.S. chart-topper. The album of the same name became their first U.S. Top Ten and first gold album, and the group performed for President and Mrs. Nixon and Prince Charles at the White House. (Pat Nixon requested that "American Woman" be dropped from the set list.)
    Trouble was brewing on the horizon, though. Guitarist Bachman, having recently converted to Mormonism, took issue with the band's typical rock & roll lifestyle, leading to clashes with Cummings. Finding the atmosphere unbearable, Bachman left the group in July 1970 and formed Brave Belt with Chad Allan, which later evolved into Bachman-Turner Overdrive. His place in the Guess Who was taken by Kurt Winter and Greg Leskiw, and the title track from their next album, "Share the Land," climbed into the Top Ten later that year, and several more singles charted afterwards. The group returned to the Top Ten one last time in 1974 with the novelty single "Clap for the Wolfman," featuring dialogue by deejay Wolfman Jack. Burdened by shifting personnel and loss of direction, Cummings broke up the band in 1975 and tried a solo career. The lineup from the Guess Who's glory years reunited in 1983, and a version of the group with constantly shifting musicians (occasionally original members) continues to tour
     
  8. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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  9. Bassist

    Bassist Gate crasher!

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    Grant Green

    Genre - Jazz

    About - Grant Green is an amazing jazz guitarist of the 60s and beyond. He has a unique style, unlike other jazz artists of his time. Later in his career, he combined his jazz skills with a new, catchy funk/soul style. He is indeed the original jam master.

    Recommended Albums - There are so, so, many. But I'll give you two, which show his evolving style.

    Idle Moments
    The Original Jam Master, VOl. 1 (Ain't It Funky Now!)
     
  10. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    Bob Marley


    Genre:
    Reggae

    Debut album:
    A great number of albums forone year: 1965

    Recommended Albums:
    Soul Rebel (1970)
    Exodus (1977)
    Legend (various)

    Biography:

    Taken from the BBC website:

    b. Robert Nesta Marley, 6 February 1945, St. Anns, Jamaica, West Indies, d. 11 May 1981, Miami, Florida, USA. This legendary singer's vocal group, the Wailers, originally comprised six members: Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso and Cherry Smith. Bob Marley And The Wailers are the sole Jamaican group to have achieved global superstar status, together with genuine penetration of world markets. The original group was formed during 1963. After extensive tuition with the great vocalist Joe Higgs, they began their recording career later that year for Coxsone Dodd, although Marley had made two singles for producer Leslie Kong in 1962 - "Judge Not" and "One Cup Of Coffee". Their first record, "Simmer Down", released just before Christmas 1963 under the group name Bob Marley And The Wailers, went to number 1 on the JBC Radio chart in January 1964, holding that position for the ensuing two months and reputedly selling over 80,000 copies. This big local hit was followed by "It Hurts To Be Alone", featuring Junior Braithwaite on lead vocal, and "Lonesome Feeling", with lead vocal by Bunny Wailer. During the period 1963-66, the Wailers made over 70 tracks for Dodd, over 20 of which were local hits, covering a wide stylistic base - from cover versions of US soul and doo-wop with ska backing, to the newer, less frantic "rude-boy" sounds that presaged the development of rocksteady, and including many songs that Marley re-recorded in the 70s.

    In late 1965, Braithwaite left to go to America, and Kelso and Smith also departed that year.
    On 10 February 1966, Marley married Rita Anderson, at the time a member of the Soulettes, later to become one of the I-Threes and a solo vocalist in her own right. The next day he left to join his mother in Wilmington, Delaware, USA returning to Jamaica in October 1966; the Wailers were now a vocal trio. They recorded the local hit "Bend Down Low" at Studio One late in 1967 (though it was actually self-produced and released on their own label, Wail 'N' Soul "M"). This and other self-produced output of the time is among the rarest, least reissued Wailers music, and catches the group on the brink of a new maturity; for the first time there were overtly Rasta songs. By the end of that year, following Bunny Wailer's release from prison, they were making demos for Danny Sims, the manager of soft-soul singer Johnny Nash, who hit the UK charts in April 1972 with the 1968 Marley composition, "Stir It Up". This association proved incapable of supporting them, and they began recording for producer Leslie Kong, who had already enjoyed international success with Desmond Dekker, the Pioneers and Jimmy Cliff.

    Kong released several singles and an album called The Best Of The Wailers in 1970.
    By the end of 1969, wider commercial success still eluded the Wailers. Marley, who had spent the summer of 1969 working at the Chrysler car factory in Wilmington, returned to Jamaica, and the trio began a collaboration with Lee Perry that proved crucially important to their future development. Not only did Perry help to focus more effectively the trio's rebel stance, but they worked with the bass and drum team of brothers, Aston "Familyman" Barrett and Carlton Barrett (b. 17 December 1950, Kingston, Jamaica, d. 1987, Kingston, Jamaica), who became an integral part of the Wailers' sound. The music Bob Marley And The Wailers made with Perry during 1969-71 represents possibly the height of their collective powers. Combining brilliant new songs such as "Duppy Conqueror", "Small Axe" and "Sun Is Shining" with definitive reworkings of old material, backed by the innovative rhythms of the Upsetters and the equally innovative influence of Perry, this body of work stands as a zenith in Jamaican music. It was also the blueprint for Bob Marley's international success.
    The Wailers continued to record for their own Tuff Gong label after the Perry sessions and came to the attention of Chris Blackwell, then owner of Island Records.

    Island had released much of the Wailers' early music from the Studio One period, although the label had concentrated on the rock market since the late 60s. Their first album for the company, 1973's Catch A Fire, was packaged like a rock set and targeted at the album market in which Island had been very successful. The original Jamaican release was remastered and two tracks removed to make the album more palatable for the rock market, a decision reached with some unease by the members of the group. The band arrived in the UK in April 1973 to tour and appear on television. In July 1973 they supported Bruce Springsteen at Max's Kansas City club in New York. Backed by an astute promotional campaign, Catch A Fire sold well enough to warrant the issue of Burnin', adding Earl Lindo to the group, which signalled a return to a militant, rootsy approach, unencumbered by any rock production values. The rock/blues guitarist Eric Clapton covered "I Shot The Sheriff" from this album, taking the tune to the number 9 position in the UK chart during the autumn of 1974, and reinforcing the impact of the Wailers in the process.
    Just as the band was poised on the brink of wider success, internal differences caused Tosh and Bunny Wailer to depart, both embarking on substantial solo careers, and Lindo left to join Taj Mahal.

    The new Wailers band, formed in mid-1974, included Marley, the Barrett brothers and Bernard "Touter" Harvey on keyboards, with vocal harmonies by the I-Threes, comprising Marcia Griffiths, Rita Marley and Judy Mowatt. This line-up, with later additions, would come to define the so-called "international" reggae sound that Bob Marley And The Wailers played until Marley's death in 1981. In establishing that form, not only on the series of albums recorded for Island but also by extensive touring, the band moved from the mainstream of Jamaican music into the global market. As the influence of Bob Marley spread, not only as a musician but also as a symbol of success from the so-called "Third World", the music made locally pursued its own distinct course.
    1975 was the year in which the Wailers consolidated their position, with the release of the massively successful Natty Dread and rapturously received concerts at the London Lyceum. These concerts attracted both black and white patrons - the crossover had begun. At the end of the year Marley achieved his first UK chart hit, the autobiographical "No Woman No Cry". His first live album, comprising material from the Lyceum concerts, was also released in that year. He continued to release an album a year until his death, at which time a spokesman for Island Records estimated worldwide sales of $190 million.

    Marley survived an assassination attempt on 3 December 1976, leaving Jamaica for 18 months in early 1977. In July, following a harmless incident when he stubbed his foot during a game of football, he had an operation in Miami to remove cancer cells from his right toe.
    Marley's music career remained bright, with the albums Exodus and Kaya enjoying massive international sales. In April 1978, he played the One Love Peace Concert in Kingston, bringing the two leaders of the violently warring Jamaican political parties (Michael Manley and Edward Seaga) together in a largely symbolic peacemaking gesture. The band then undertook a huge worldwide tour that took in the USA, Canada, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. His own label, Tuff Gong, was expanding its interests, developing new talent. The album Survival was released to the usual acclaim, being particularly successful in Africa. The song "Zimbabwe" was subsequently covered many times by African artists. In 1980, Marley and the Wailers played a momentous concert in the newly liberated Zimbabwe to an audience of 40,000. In the summer of 1980, his cancer began to spread; he collapsed at Madison Square Garden during a concert. Late in 1980 he began treatment with the controversial cancer specialist Dr.

    Josef Issels. By 3 May, the doctor had given up. Marley flew to Miami, Florida, where he died on 11 May.
    Marley was rightly celebrated in 1992 with the release of an outstanding CD box set chronicling his entire career, although his discography remains cluttered due to the legal ramifications of his estate. His global success had been an inspiration to all Jamaican artists; his name became synonymous with Jamaican music, of which he had been the first authentic superstar. His contribution is thus immense: his career did much to focus the attention of the world on Jamaican music and to establish credibility for it. In addition, he was a charismatic performer, a great singer and superb songwriter - an impossible act to follow for other Jamaican artists.


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  11. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    EDIT: Sorry I should have mentioned this before you all contributed: could you turn you signature off for posts in this thread, for better viewing I guess... to do this (if you have already posted) go to "edit" and un-check "show signature"... do the same if you are replying... cheers!
     
  12. dedhead95

    dedhead95 The Wizard of Rhythm

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    Beck (Hansen)

    BORN: July 8, 1970, Los Angeles, CA

    Genre: Alt, Blues, Folk, Electronica, Hard Rock

    Beck is one of the strangest icons in music history. Mixing his backround of folk & blues with rap, techno, & heavy drum beats. In my opinion, Beck is possibly the greatest artist of all time.

    [​IMG]

    Recommended Albums:
    "Mutations" (1998)
    "Mellow Gold" (1994)
    "Odelay" (1996)

    Recommended Songs:
    "Lord Only Knows"
    "Mixed Bizness"
    "Hotwax"
    "Fourteen Rivers, Fourteen Floods"
    "Sing it Again"

    more info....
    Beck.com
     
  13. Laura-the-flowergirl

    Laura-the-flowergirl Long haired child

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    Artist: The Libertines

    Genre:indie rock

    Members(current): Peter Doherty, Carlos Barât, John Hassal, Gary Powell

    Recommended Albums
    "Up the bracket"
    "The Libertines"

    Recommended Songs:
    "Up the bracket"
    "The good old days"
    "The boy looked at Johnny"
    "Death on the stairs"
    "Can't stand me now"
    "The man who would be king"
    "Music when the lights go out"

    (warning: please don't mind my poor English, I've done my best [​IMG])

    When people hear of The Libertines, they mostly think of Pete Doherty, Kate Moss and a lot of drugs. But there's so much more you should know.
    The Libertines knew a difficult start, but after a lot of member switches they finally managed to get the ball rolling with their singles What a waster and Don't look back into the sun. Those singles immediately showed what The Libertines stood for: a lot of enthusiasm, a huge urge for freedom and liberty, but with more immersion than an average punk band. They also had this wonderful way of thinking and believing. The two frontmen, songwriters and singers Pete Doherty and Carl Barât had a very special friendship, and they both said they were sailing on their good ship Albion (word for old England) to Arcadia (imaginary place where everything is peaceful and everything is like you ever wanted it to be). Maybe a quite naieve way of thinking, but also very romantic and idealistic in a beautiful way.
    Their first album Up the bracket was the album of a young band that promised to be the best thing that happened to the UK since years. Songs like "Time for heroes", "Up the bracket", "I get along" and "Boys in the band" became very popular in the indie scene. But it also became clear that The Libertines wouldn't exactly be a band with ordinary guys doing ordinary things. It was absolutely wonderful to see Pete and Carl perform together, it sometimes even seemed like they were lovers. But while Carl stopped taking drugs and lessened his wild rock'n'roll lifestyle, Pete only went further and further in doing this. His alarming drug use and often annoying behaviour led to a lot of fights with Carl. One day, he even broke in into Carls apartment. Pete was sent to jail for a month and most people we're thinking this would be the end of the band. But when Pete left prison, Carl was waiting for him outside. that night they gave a great gig, musically maybe not their best gig, but without a doubt the one with the most magic in it.
    Despite this sudden moment of love, Pete's drug use still got worse and worse, and Carl couldn't handle it anymore. But he wanted to finish the second album, and with the help of security in the recording studio they evened managed to do that! The second album was called The Libertines, and sounded quite different from Up the bracket. The youthful enthusiam wasn't there anymore in most songs, but it still was a wonderful cd. Musically they were still chaotic, but not too chaotic (nowadays Pete unfortunately crosses the limit between charming chaotic, and annoying chaotic with his new band Babyshambles). The second album was very sincere and heartbreaking. It was Carl and Pete's story. How they hated each other, but also felt that they'd always love each other anyway. It let Carl speak, how he wanted the old Pete back, and how he wanted to help Pete with his problem, and especially how he loved Pete. It let Pete speak, how he didn't feel like he had a problem, how he felt in prison, how he loved Carl. "Can't stand me now" is a dialogue between them, and actually it tells you the whole story.
    A week after the release of the second album, Carl puts Pete out of the band and sends him to rehab. Pete runs away from the rehab centre and starts a new life with more drugs and his other project, Babyshambles. Carl feels awful, 'cause Pete seems to hate him, but still he doesn't want to give up and he signs a solo contract deal. Pete starts dating Kate Moss, and for her he stops taking heroin. He doesn't quit taking coke, though. In April Carl and Pete finally talk again, and they make up with a lot of hugs and sweet words. They don't reform, though. Unfortunately, because Babyshambles never will be as good as the Libertines. The Libertines had everything. Great music, a great soul and a lot of love. Let's hope Pete and Carl will see that one day, and reform. 'Cause like they sang in "The good old days": "If you've lost your faith in love and music, the end won't be long".
    The Libertines is a band you can fall in love with, really fall in love with. Pete and Carl singing together is the greatest sound you've ever heard and the most beautiful thing you've ever seen. Poets, musicians right from the heart, and good people (Pete seems annoying nowadays, but under the drugs and the media, he's a good-hearted lad). You must love them.

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  14. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    Jimmy Cliff

    Genre:
    Reggae

    Debut album:
    Numerous albums of one year: 1969

    Recommended Albums:
    The Harder They Come (1972)
    Give the People What They Want (1981)

    Biography:

    Taken from the BBC website:

    b. James Chambers, 1 April 1948, Somerton, St. Catherine, Jamaica, West Indies. One of the great popularizers of reggae music, Jimmy Cliff blazed a trail into rock that Bob Marley later followed, but without ever capitalizing on his great advantages as a singer-songwriter, nascent film star and interpreter of other people's material. Raised by his father, Cliff first moved to Kingston in 1962 after the dream of a musical career seduced him from his studies. An early brace of singles, "Daisy Got Me Crazy", with Count Boysie, and "I'm Sorry", for sound system operator Sir Cavalier, did little to bring him to the public's attention. His career began in earnest when a song he had written himself, "Hurricane Hattie", describing the recent arrival in South America of the self-same meteorological disaster, became a local hit. He was still only 14 years old.
    Cliff subsequently emerged as a ska singer for producer Leslie Kong in 1963, singing "King Of Kings" and "Dearest Beverley" in a hoarse, raucous voice to considerable local acclaim. He can be seen in this fledgling role on the video This Is Ska, shot in 1964. The same year Cliff joined a tour promoted by politician Edward Seaga and headlined by Byron Lee And The Dragonaires, with the intention of exporting reggae music to the wider world.

    Though it later collapsed in acrimony, the jaunt at least brought Cliff to the attention of Island Records' boss Chris Blackwell, and in the mid-60s the young singer moved to London. By 1968 Cliff was being groomed as a solo star for the underground rock market. Musicians teamed with him included Mott The Hoople's Ian Hunter and vocalists including Madeline Bell and P.P. Arnold. The shift away from the conventional reggae audience was confirmed by a cover version of Procol Harum's "Whiter Shade Of Pale" and appearances alongside the Incredible String Band and Jethro Tull on Island samplers. In 1968, Cliff chanced his arm in Brazil, representing Jamaica in the International Song Festival.
    His entry, "Waterfall" (a flop in the UK), earned him a considerable following in South America. More importantly, the sojourn gave him the chance to take stock and write new material. He finally broke through in 1969 with "Wonderful World, Beautiful People", a somewhat over-produced single typical of the era, which he had written in Brazil. "Vietnam" was a small hit the following year, and was described by Bob Dylan as not only the best record about the war, but the best protest song he had heard. Paul Simon went one step further in his praises; after hearing the song he travelled to Kingston and booked the same rhythm section, studio and engineer to record "Mother And Child Reunion" - arguably the first US reggae song.

    In local terms, however, its success was outstripped by "Wild World", a cover version of the Cat Stevens song, the link between the two singers perhaps strengthened by a shared Muslim faith.
    While the albums Jimmy Cliff, Hard Road To Travel and particularly Another Cycle were short on roots credibility, his next move, as the gun-toting, reggae-singing star of The Harder They Come (1973), was short on nothing. Cliff, with his ever-present five-point star T-shirt, was suddenly Jamaica's most marketable property. The Harder They Come was the island's best home-grown film, and its soundtrack one of the biggest-selling reggae records of all time. Cliff seemed set for superstardom. Somehow, it never happened: his relationship with Island soured and contracts with EMI Records, Reprise Records and CBS Records failed to deliver him to his rightful place. In fact, his star began to wane directly as Bob Marley signed to Island. The company executed the same marketing process for both artists - rebellion, great songwriting, hipness - but it was Marley who embodied the new spirit of reggae and reaped the rewards. Cliff's artistic fortunes were revived, ironically enough, by the recruitment of Wailers producer Joe Higgs as his bandleader. Despite their merits, Cliff's excellent records for his own Sunpower label did not really connect.

    To many outside the reggae world Cliff remains best known for writing the beautiful tear-jerker "Many Rivers To Cross", a massive hit for UB40. However, his popularity on the African continent is enormous, arguably greater than that of any other reggae artist, Marley included. He is similarly venerated in South America, whose samba rhythms have helped to inform and enrich his latter-day material. His most recent studio albums highlight, as ever, his gospel-tinged delivery, offering ample evidence to dispel the widely held belief (particularly in the West) that he is a perennial underachiever.

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  15. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    The Beatles

    Genre:
    Pop/Rock

    Debut album:
    Please Please Me (1963)

    Recommended Albums:
    Revolver (1966)
    Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)
    The White Album (1968)

    Biography:

    The biography I have found on this one passes the maximum character length of the post, and I don't know nearly enough to write a biography on one of the most influencial bands of all time, so here's a link to the BBC biography:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cgi-perl/music/muze/index.pl?site=music&action=biography&artist_id=2726

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  16. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    Allman Brothers Band

    Genre:
    Blues/Jazz/Rock

    Debut album:
    The Allman Brothers Band (1969)

    Recommended Albums:
    At The Fillmore East (1971)
    East a Peach (1972)

    Biography:

    Taken from BBC artist profiles:

    Formed in Macon, Georgia, USA, in 1969 by guitarist Duane Allman (b. Howard Duane Allman, 20 November 1946, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, d. 29 October 1971, Macon, Georgia, USA), the band included brother Gregg Allman (b. Gregory Lenoir Allman, 8 December 1947, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; keyboards, vocals), Forrest Richard "Dickey" Betts (b. 12 December 1943, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA; guitar), Raymond Berry Oakley (b. 4 April 1948, Chicago, Illinois, USA, d. 11 November 1972, USA; bass), Butch Trucks (b. Claude Hudson Trucks Jnr., Jacksonville, Florida, USA; drums) and Jai "Jaimoe" Johanny Johanson (b. John Lee Johnson, 8 July 1944, Ocean Springs, Mississippi, USA; drums). The above line-up was an amalgamation of the members of several southern-based aspirants, of which the Hour Glass was the most prolific. The latter pop/soul ensemble featured Duane and Gregg Allman, and broke up when demo tapes for a projected third album were rejected by their record company. Duane then found employment at the Fame studio where he participated in several sessions, including those for Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and King Curtis, prior to instigating this new sextet.
    The Allman Brothers established themselves as a popular live attraction and their first two albums, The Allman Brothers Band and Idlewild South, were marked by strong blues-based roots and an exciting rhythmic drive.

    Nevertheless, it was a sensational two-album set, Live At The Fillmore East, that showcased the band's emotional fire. "Whipping Post", a 22-minute tour de force, remains one of rock music's definitive improvisational performances. The set brought the band to the brink of stardom, while Duane's reputation as an outstanding slide guitarist was further enhanced by his contribution to Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs, the seminal Derek And The Dominos album. Unfortunately, tragedy struck on 29 October 1971 when this gifted musician was killed in a motorcycle accident.
    The remaining members completed Eat A Peach, which consisted of live and studio material, before embarking on a more mellow direction with the US chart-topper Brothers And Sisters, a style best exemplified by the album's number 2 hit single, "Ramblin' Man". A second pianist, Chuck Leavell (b. 1950, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA), was added to the line-up, but just as the band recovered its momentum, Berry Oakley was killed in an accident chillingly similar to that of his former colleague on 11 November 1972. Not surprisingly, the Allman Brothers seemed deflated, and subsequent releases failed to match the fire of those first recordings. Their power was further diminished by several offshoot projects. Gregg Allman (who later married Cher twice) and Dickey Betts embarked on solo careers while Leavell, Johanson and new bass player Lamar Williams (b.

    1947, Hansboro, Mississippi, USA, d. 21 January 1983, a victim of cancer) formed Sea Level.
    The Allmans broke up acrimoniously in 1976 following a notorious drugs trial in which Gregg testified against a former road manager. Although the other members vowed never to work with the vocalist again, a reconstituted 1978 line-up included Allman, Betts and Trucks. Enlightened Rogues was a US Top 10 success, but subsequent albums fared less well and in 1982 the Allman Brothers Band split for a second time. A new incarnation appeared in 1989 with a line-up of Gregg Allman (vocals, organ), Betts (vocals, lead guitar), Warren Haynes (b. 6 April 1960, Asheville, North Carolina, USA; vocals, slide and lead guitar), Douglas Allen Woody (b. 1956, USA, d. 26 August 2000, Queens, New York City, New York, USA; bass), Johnny Neel (keyboards), Trucks (drums) and Mark Quinones (percussion). This much-heralded reunion spawned a credible release: Seven Turns. Neel left the band and the remaining sextet made Shades Of Two Worlds. Quinones (congas and percussion) joined for An Evening With The Allman Brothers Band in 1992. The 1994 album, Where It All Begins, was recorded effectively live in the studio, with production once more by Allman Brothers veteran Tom Dowd.

    Further studio work followed, but it is as a touring unit that the band retains its remarkable popularity. Woody and Haynes left in April 1997 to join Gov't Mule. New members Derek Trucks (b. 1980, Jacksonville, Florida, USA; guitar) and Oteil Burbridge (bass) were subsequently added to the line-up. Betts was sacked in early 2000 and released a solo album Let's Get Together the following year.
    The work displayed on the Allman Brothers Band first five albums remains among the finest guitar music recorded during the late 60s and early 70s, noted, in particular, for the skilful interplay between two gifted, imaginative guitarists.

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    ________________________________________________________________

    C'mon people, more people can contribute! Credit goes to the people who have already done one though, a beer for you lot! :)
     
  17. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

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    its so very true
     
  18. boothy

    boothy Senior Member

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    .
     
  19. blueeyedson

    blueeyedson Member

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    just a few things very quickly about each artist

    Tim Buckley (Feb 14, 1947-June 29, 1975)

    First things first about Tim Buckley was that amazing voice, stretching easily over 5 octaves. he released his first album in 1966 at 19 under Elektra. started in folk music circles and would experiment with a wide variety of styles: funky, freeform, progressive jazz; folk-rock; a bit of psychedelia; and all else in between. never sold many albums, pre or post death, but his influence is underestimated. with every album, he made drastic changes in his style, but his vocals were always something to listen to and he never dissapointed. by the time Greetings From L.A. was released in 1972, his populatiry (or lack there of) plummeted even deeper. his small number of devoted fans shrank as a result of his constant changes in musical direction, and a vey uncommercial approach to his music. in 1974, his last studio album was released, Look At The Fool, which is maybe the least impressive of his efforts. but concerts were truly where he would shine brightest, being able to showcase his remarkabe voice...his personal life was never smooth, many drug problems, among rocky family, business and financial relations. his death came tragically at the age of 28 in 1975, when, as he had been sober for quite some time, he snorted some heroin at the house of his friend Richard Keeling on a dare. he overdosed from it, too much after too long a time of being clean.

    Recommended Albums
    Tim Buckley (1966)
    Goodbye And Hello (1967)
    Happy/Sad (1969)
    Starsailor (1970)
    Dream Letter: Live In London, 1968 (released 1990)
    Live At The Troubadour 1969 (released 1994)

    Jeff Buckley (Nov 17, 1966-May 29, 1997)

    his son Jeff Buckley inherited his incredible vocal range and went on to become much more popular than his father, though never really a commercial success. his one and only official studio album, Grace, was released in 1994, and has become recognized as one of the best albums of the 90's. before this, he was a regular at Sin-E playing his so far limited originals, with a wide variety of covers, from Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and Leonard Cohen, to Edith Piaf and Joni Mitchell, to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. the recordings from these shows have been released, first as an E.P., then as a double album called Live At Sin-E. while working on the follow-up to his debut, having recorded rough sketches of some 20 songs, he dissapeared in a rough stretch of the Mississippi after going for a swim, fully clothed. he was found dead shortly, drowned. speculation of a suicide have been mentioned. just like his father, Jeff died at an early age, and there are remarkable stories of similarities in personality and character between Jeff and the father he hadn't seen since the age of 9. Tim Buckley's influence on his son musically is unquestionable, though Jeff never mentioned so much as ever even hearing his father's music to most people. this is very obvious to be false.

    Recommended Albums
    Grace (1994)
    Sketches For My Sweetheart The Drunk (1998)
    Mystery White Boy (2000)
    Live At Sin-E (2003)

    Suggested Reading
    Dream Brother: The Lives & Music Of Tim & Jeff Buckley by David Browne

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    Tim Buckley Jeff Buckley
     
  20. RELAYER

    RELAYER mādhyamaka

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    YES

    Genre: Progressive Rock, Jazz, Trippin Face Spiritual Music.

    Members: (Current) Jon Anderson, Steve Howe, Alan White, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman

    Debut Album: Self Titled (1969)

    Recommended Albums: The Yes Album
    Relayer
    Tales From Topographic Oceans
    Close To The Edge
    Fragile
    Going For The One
    Yessongs

    Biography: yesworld.com

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