Hydroponics

Discussion in 'Stoners Lounge' started by placid_waters, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. placid_waters

    placid_waters Member

    anything grown hydroponically is going to be stronger ?
     
  2. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

  3. digitalldj

    digitalldj Canucks ftw!

    By definition, i would say yes

    but there's always factors to everything
     
  4. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

    by definition? soil-less cultivation of plants in a nutrient solution.

    in what way does that definition imply that hydroponics create more potent plants?
     
  5. digitalldj

    digitalldj Canucks ftw!

    growing hyrdoponically, imo has a much more controlled state, therefor if u know what your doing, your odds increase of a stronger yield

    but like i said, it all depends on many factors
     
  6. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

    we are talking potency, not yield, but i agree that its a rather controlled state.

    But, the question was... "anything grown hydroponically is going to be stronger ?"

    the answer is NO.

    hydroponics is just soil-less culture. thats it. it has nothing to do with lighting, which controls a good portion of the potency expectancy.
     
  7. paintballer687

    paintballer687 Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    If using the same conditions, with the only variable being soil or no soil, it will be more potent. Because it does not have to use it's energy to grow roots to absorb nutrients, it's excess energy goes into the buds, increasing quantity as well as quality.
     
  8. Born2Lose

    Born2Lose Member

    I completely agree with you, growing hydroponically will not do anything to increase the potency. Although it is a much more controlled state, and you can definately get a better yield from my experience.
     
  9. digitalldj

    digitalldj Canucks ftw!

    ohh hahah fuck..k i dunno if u will belive me when i say this

    but when i read "stronger" i had no point in my mind leaning towards potency, i thought he meant like a healthier, stronger plant lol
     
  10. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

    i not sure if i uderstand your post. are you saying that hydroponic plants dont grow big root systems?
     
  11. 40oz and chronic

    40oz and chronic 'Nuff Said

    [​IMG]
     
  12. paintballer687

    paintballer687 Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    Yup. Plants only grow roots to expand their surface area, as well as radius, to absorb nutrients from the soil. Because using hydroponics removes the soil, the plant does not need to increase it's root size and length to increase it's nutrient intake. This extra energy goes into the the rest of the plant, increasing the mass and potency of the buds.
     
  13. Willy_Wonka_27

    Willy_Wonka_27 Surrender to the Flow

    oh ok. in that case you are mistaken.

    here is a picture of the roots of a some hydroponicly grown marijuana plants.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. billy96

    billy96 Member

    those babys yours?
     
  15. paintballer687

    paintballer687 Hip Forums Supporter HipForums Supporter

    I guess I am mistaken about the root systems. But I was never really talking about the visual level, I'm talking about the chemistry of the plant. When growing in soil, the plant requires nutrients to grow. In soil, some nutrients are never in excess. Whenever a plant isn't given abundent nutrients, it puts stress on the plant, causing it to expand its roots, rather than foliage. In hydroponics, all required nutrients can be given in excess, allowing that extra ATP to go towards its stems, leaves, and buds.

    I guess I was wrong in the sense that I was saying that the plant does not grow roots in hydroponics, but the point I was really trying to make is that it's not going to be stressed and cause an increase in root growth relevant to remaining plant growth. Now, if a plant was grown in soil with the required nutrients completely in excess, it would grow just as efficiently as hydroponics. But this is an ideal case. Realistically, no soil is that nutrient rich, and even it was, the nutrients would be absorbed and the roots would have to be grown at a greater than normal rate to reach new nutrients.
     

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