FBI: "no hard evidence connecting Usama Bin Laden to 9/11"

Discussion in 'America Attacks!' started by Lucifer Sam, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. Lucifer Sam

    Lucifer Sam Vegetable Man

    This is wild.

    If you go to the FBI's "Most Wanted Terrorists" page and look up Usama Bin Laden, you might notice something strange. He is not noted as being wanted for 9/11. The page reads, "Usama Bin Laden is wanted in connection with the August 7, 1998, bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. These attacks killed over 200 people. In addition, Bin Laden is a suspect in other terrorist attacks throughout the world." And that's it. Does that seem a little odd to you?

    http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/terrorists/terbinladen.htm

    Well, other people found it strange, too. The Muckracker Report apparently contacted the FBI Headquarters to ask why Bin Laden is not specifically wanted for 9/11. The FBI's response? "The reason why 9/11 is not mentioned on Usama Bin Laden's Most Wanted page is because the FBI has no hard evidence connecting Bin Laden to 9/11."

    What was that again? Hmm...

    http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=20060610&articleId=2623
     
  2. rangerdanger

    rangerdanger Senior Member

    When jr.first started accusing bin, the Taliban offered to arrest him and turn him over to an international court, all bush had to do was abide by international law by stating why he suspected him, as in evidence. bush refused,and instead spent billions to invade Afganistan and kill thousands of people.

    The real reasons bush invaded Afganistan:
    -to build a pipeline across the country. There had been negotiations bewteen the U.S. & taliban for several years, but the Taliban refused, citing the U.S.'s support of Isreal in it's war against the Palistinians.
    Btw, the U.S. was instrumental in the Taliban gaining power, having given the muhajadeen (inc. bin) millions during their war against Russia.
    -and to re-start opium poppy production, almost wiped out by the fundamentalist Taliban. The cia makes millions (billions)/year off the international opium/heroin trade.
    And every year since the invasion, opium poppy production has skyrocketed. More raw opium is being smuggled out of Afganistan (usually through our ally Pakistan) than ever before.
    Opium that will, as heroin, end up in the arms of humdreds of thousands of people worldwide, especially in the U.S.
    Is this a great country or what?
     
  3. Politics are awesome

    Politics are awesome Politics suck

    Even though.... he admitted to masterminding the attacks.... on television.

    IDiots. :rolleyes:
     
  4. LickHERish

    LickHERish Senior Member

    No, he did not. A conveniently found video tape (well after the fact) which upon inspection was so transparently bogus as to make highschool photshop hacks blush with embarrassment, attempted to make it appear he had.

    In point of fact, UBL categorically disavowed any involvement in any way shape or form with the 911 attacks in a documented Pakistani press interview within days of the attacks. A report that did not, of course, gain any media mention in the ensuing deluge of "official proclamations of whodunit" following the attacks.

    This is fundamental background research long exposed by the 911 truth movement for any who bother to shake off the repeated, unproven, soundbites and go review the public record with an objective mind. Sadly far too few will ever bother since just going with the accepted public psyche of the matter means incurring far less disapproval. The sheep don't like their grazing disrupted by the demand for myth-shattering acknowledgements.

    Too much civic duty would be required of them to actually oppose the organised criminal system they have grown up believing in as "good" and "freedom-loving" and "just". Those at the heart of our insitutions rely on such easily ingrained mythologies to keep the status quo firmly in their favour.
     

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