cool article in Golf Digest about barefeet

Discussion in 'Bare It!' started by txbarefooter, May 24, 2004.

  1. txbarefooter

    txbarefooter Senior Member

    removed.........
     
  2. Sax_Machine

    Sax_Machine saxbend

    fuck's sake. That's all we need, an article giving barefooters a reputation for being thick. PractiSe - it's a verb! ;)
     
  3. txbarefooter

    txbarefooter Senior Member

    ....................
     
  4. Sax_Machine

    Sax_Machine saxbend

    I suppose you spell the noun Advice with an 's' as well do you? And Definitely with an 'a'? Don't they teach you anything at school these days? ;)

    I'm fully aware of the shortcomings in Sherman spelling but there are a few things that are right and wrong on BOTH sides of the pond.
     
  5. txbarefooter

    txbarefooter Senior Member

    ..........
     
  6. Sax_Machine

    Sax_Machine saxbend

    Well there you GO then!

    S for a verb, C for a noun.
     
  7. sreed24

    sreed24 Member

    Saxmachine,

    Not sure where you are coming from or why it seems to be so important to you but be assured that in American english it is practice; practise is chiefly British. The noun/verb thing has nothing to do with it:

    prac·tise [​IMG] ( P ) Pronunciation Key (pr[​IMG]k[​IMG]t[​IMG]s)
    v. & n. Chiefly British
    Variant of practice. prac·tice [​IMG] ( P ) Pronunciation Key (pr[​IMG]k[​IMG]t[​IMG]s)
    v. prac·ticed, prac·tic·ing, prac·tic·es
    v. tr.
    1. To do or perform habitually or customarily; make a habit of: practices courtesy in social situations.
    2. To do or perform (something) repeatedly in order to acquire or polish a skill: practice a dance step.
    3. To give lessons or repeated instructions to; drill: practiced the students in handwriting.
    4. To work at, especially as a profession: practice law.
    5. To carry out in action; observe: practices a religion piously.
    6. Obsolete. To plot (something evil).
    v. intr.
    1. To do or perform something habitually or repeatedly.
    2. To do something repeatedly in order to acquire or polish a skill.
    3. To work at a profession.
    4. Archaic. To intrigue or plot.
    n.
    1. A habitual or customary action or way of doing something: makes a practice of being punctual.
      1. <LI type=a>Repeated performance of an activity in order to learn or perfect a skill: Practice will make you a good musician. <LI type=a>A session of preparation or performance undertaken to acquire or polish a skill: goes to piano practice weekly; scheduled a soccer practice for Saturday. <LI type=a>Archaic. The skill so learned or perfected.
      2. The condition of being skilled through repeated exercise: out of practice.
    2. The act or process of doing something; performance or action: a theory that is difficult to put into practice.
    3. Exercise of an occupation or profession: the practice of law.
    4. The business of a professional person: an obstetrician with her own practice.
    5. A habitual or customary action or act. Often used in the plural: That company engages in questionable business practices. Facial tattooing is a standard practice among certain peoples.
    6. Law. The methods of procedure used in a court of law.
    7. Archaic.
      1. The act of tricking or scheming, especially with malicious intent.
      2. A trick, scheme, or intrigue.
    Note: The analogy of the English language requires that the noun and verb which are pronounced alike should agree in spelling. Thus we have notice (n. & v.), noticed, noticing, noticer; poultice (n. & v.); apprentice (n. & v.); office (n. & v.), officer (n.); lattice (n.), latticed (a.); benefice (n.), beneficed (a.), etc. Cf. sacrifice (?; n. & v.), surmise (?; n. & v.), promise (?; n. & v.); compromise (?; n. & v.), etc. Contrast advice (?; n.), and advise (?); device (?), and devise (?), etc.
    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.
     
  8. txbarefooter

    txbarefooter Senior Member

    thanks sreed, I'm not sure what the problem was either. I didn't like the fact the thread got hijacked from being about P R A C T I C I N G golf barefoot to one about spelling, so I removed my parts of it.
     
  9. nimh

    nimh ~foodie~

    aw and i wanted to read about the barefooted golfers.
     
  10. sreed24

    sreed24 Member

    For what it's worth the great golfer Sam Snead touted the virtues of playing barefoot.It's sad...I've seen people, females mostly, playing golf or hitting balls at the driving range in sandals and flip flops. I can't tell you how ridiculous this is...the golf swing is a very precise motion which requires balance and traction. Golf shoes work, most athletic shoes work okay, and bare feet work just fine. But any sort of sandal just doesn't work and handicaps the golfer severely. I've practically wanted to yell at these people to kick off their shoes to hit their shots and give themselves a chance. I guess it is so ingrained in them that they have to keep their shoes on that they even sacrifice function.

    I'm not so much of a barefooter myself but I totally support the rights of those who prefer to be barefoot to be barefoot without being hassled, and without people ignorantly thinking that it is unsantiary or dangerous.
     
  11. Sax_Machine

    Sax_Machine saxbend

    Well, what I said, I said with tongue firmly in cheek. No need to get so worked up about it. I'm just a bit of a grammatical pedant that's all.
     

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