Are Intelligent Machines Entitled to take over the world...

Discussion in 'Random Thoughts' started by Ash_Freakstreet, Jan 5, 2005.

  1. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    and replace humans as the dominant species?

    //Come to think about it, Didn't we do the same to the
    //neanderthals? If AI robots are superior to us in all
    //regards, wouldn't they be entitled to take over?
     
  2. mynameiskc

    mynameiskc way to go noogs!

    might makes right. anything that CAN take over the world, naturally speaking, has the Right to take over the world. nature's a mean dirty bitch. which is the reason we've spent our entire existance trying to divorce her. really, it's just pissed her off. good thinkg she's good lookin', eh?
     
  3. Soulless||Chaos

    Soulless||Chaos SelfInducedExistence

    I suppose looking strictly at it from an evolutionary viewpoint they would be, except they aren't natural... :rolleyes: But as the former most dominant species, we have the right to do our best to destroy them... :D
     
  4. mynameiskc

    mynameiskc way to go noogs!

    no such thing as un=-natural. anything that can exist is natural.
     
  5. Maes

    Maes Senior Member

    The Homo sapiens did not eradicate the neanderthal man. They had different skills and different levels of adaptation and therefore have changed the geography they used to live in that is also due to the climate change and etc. There may be a lot of neanderthal people living among us today but have evolved in different ways.

    About a dominant AI. The problem with humans is that they can't be systemized unlike the machines. While machines and AIs act in a given set of relations and create new sets of relations in reference to the prior ones, human beings can be much more diverse, relative, unsystematic and most importantly IRRATIONAL.

    It's the question of building and irrational mind, an irrational AI. You can not create an irrational AI unless you know all that is rational. Which sounds quite impossible for knowledge most probably is a line parallel to time. Or maybe a helix.
     
  6. Soulless||Chaos

    Soulless||Chaos SelfInducedExistence

    But robots would be created, all other creatures evolved from various things, they came from nature... Robots wouldn't come from nature, they'd come from us. Though you are right in the first post, might makes right. But the real question is, could we put our brains in robotic bodies? :D
     
  7. mynameiskc

    mynameiskc way to go noogs!

    we're natural, robots would be our creation. anything can can be created is a natural evolution. c'mon now, don't you remember the wise words of love & rockets? you cannot go against nature, because if you do go against nature, it's a part of nature too.
     
  8. seamonster66

    seamonster66 discount dracula

    I've already worked for humans, wouldn't mind giving the robots a chance now.

    Thanks for reminding me of No New Tale to Tell
     
  9. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    // Yes we very well may
    // Then We are adopting the "if you can't beat 'em join 'em"
    // approach

    //keep in mind there is not going to be a Great Robot Vs. Human
    // Battle... our dependence on robots will increase gradually over
    // time, until we are helpless, and at their mercy. But As I said,
    // we can join them by transferring our memories and intelligence
    // into their substrate



    //and I believe that strong AI is possible
    //We, ourselves are machines and machines
    //can generally be reverse-engineered.
     
  10. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    //I actually have this feeling that they might be better rulers than us
     
  11. sasquatch

    sasquatch Member

    i agree that the word "natural" is often incorrectly used to mean "non-human". But in this case, robots are not something that naturally evolved into existence. They were created by humans. Kind of like the way humans were created by god, if you believe creationism. And humans became the dominant species, so i guess if you're a creationist then you'd think that its just fine for robots to become dominant. but if you believe in the evolution of life then that thought would seem unnatural.
     
  12. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    //yes creation by humans is intelligent rather than random, but it
    //can still be considered evolutionary, because it involves the
    //darwinian principle of natural selection. Sure, they are created
    //by humans, but they are selected by the environment.
     
  13. mynameiskc

    mynameiskc way to go noogs!

    humans evolved with a need to create and to tinker. therefore the things that we create and tinker with are products of evolution.
     
  14. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    //exactly, tool-making is one of the things that set humans apart
    //from other animals
     
  15. Maes

    Maes Senior Member

    Sie ist hundert prozent right.
    What ever man does is a piece of his culture and whatever occurs in nature becomes natural, innate.
     
  16. Ash_Freakstreet

    Ash_Freakstreet Hmm.... GROOVY!

    //but it is the humans who define what is natural and what is not
    //and at times, things like interracial marriages were considered
    //un-natural
     
  17. mynameiskc

    mynameiskc way to go noogs!

    of course i'm right. i'm always right.
     
  18. seamonster66

    seamonster66 discount dracula

    "Caveman no fool, caveman use tool"-the Cramps
     
  19. Maes

    Maes Senior Member

    That's about the change of our consideration of what's natural and what is not. It's about the rhetoric of conservatism and progressivism which takes place not in nature and time but only in minds.
     
  20. sasquatch

    sasquatch Member

    would you consider intelligent machines to be a form of life?
     

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