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Super Cute Little Robot Designed To Help Kids With Autism




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#1 sleepycc

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Posted November 06 2016 - 11:51 PM

Aisoy1-emotional-robot-autism.jpg

Parents and members of the scientific community are continually on the search for answers to autism. Why it happens and the best way to deal with it are chief among the questions they routinely ask themselves. While there may be no clear answers at this point, entrepreneurs are persistent in their efforts to find ways to make living with autism easier for individuals afflicted with it and their caregivers. Now, researchers at Spain’s Universidad Miguel Hernández and the Spanish Aisoy Robotics company have teamed up to investigate how the robotic’s group’s new educational robot, Aisoy1 V5, may be able to enhance the effectiveness of therapy sessions conducted at the university’s clinic.

Kids with Autism


The joint effort is in relationship to developing children’s emotional, social and cognitive skills. Looked upon as a buddy for the children, the friendly educational tool will, hopefully, over time together, aid in building up emotional attachments between the kids and Aisoy1 with a view towards assisting in therapeutic adherence. Aisoy1’s outward appearance is surely likeable enough. In fact, it looks more like a toy than an educational tool, but that was undoubtedly in the developers’ minds when they designed it. Creating something other than appealing in appearance would certainly undermine the entire effort.

Aisoy-robot-and-girl.jpg

Autism Studies


Recently, José Manuel del Río, Aisoy’s CEO, was quoted on Digital Trends as saying, “We already have an Emotional OS, called Airos, which includes an emotional engine, a cognitive engine, and a decision engine. It has an application level for building user apps we call Bot-apps. Clinica Universitaria UMH and Aisoy [are working] together for designing and building Bot-apps which use Airos’ capabilities [as well as the] Aisoy1 robot, adapted to children with autism.” He went on to say that scientists haven’t delved into in-depth studies yet concerning why robots are so suitable for the endeavor, but he suggested it more than likely lies in the “expressivity of the face” of Aisoy1, making it easier for kids to “understand and communicate with.”
 

Future Applications for Robots


In the future, the group’s goal is that Aisoy1 or its successor could perhaps be expanded to achieve results with other childhood disorders like ADD, hyperactivity and impulsivity issues. “We are going to finish the development phase [of our current work] in a couple of weeks,” del Río said. “Then we are going to [start work on a] study applying that therapy [to] 50 children, [ranging between] 8 to 10 years old. If results are positive, we will deliver those programs to interested parents for [use in] their homes.” The hope is that a tested version of the robotic software for Aisoy1 will be available as early as January 2017.

See more at  http://www.kynix.com/Blog/?PCID=1


Edited by sleepycc, November 06 2016 - 11:52 PM.


#2 hotwater

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Posted November 07 2016 - 12:02 AM

Well I suppose anything is better than those fake Facilitated Communication devices from back in the 90s 

 

 

 

 

Hotwater


  • youfreeme likes this
Never! This is outrageous. I'm through with it. I'll have no more of this hell-spawn!

#3 Wu Li Heron

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Posted November 07 2016 - 11:52 AM

Sounds great. My own suspicion is that their success is also just part of the fact that autistic kids don't feel as intimidated by a robot as they might by human beings. They see the world differently and I'm sure they're aware of that fact, but the robot not being conscious doesn't constitute a reminder of that fact.



#4 Juallan

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Posted November 14 2016 - 04:25 AM

I don't know about autism in depth nor do I have any science or medical degrees,but I do have some questions. I think that being able to read people's facial expressions naturally cues us as to what'sthe next appropriate response. Fear for example is expressed by one to alert another that their behavior is too aggressive. A smile with eye contact and nodding suggests that we should continue our conversation. A person can say yes while you are talking to them but be staring at the floor, have a grimmace, or change of inflection in the voice. These cues cannot be conveyed by a robot. Rather than trying to teach the autistic child to have "appropriate" social behaviors, we invest all the money for "fixing" these kids into counseling for care takers and loved ones, classes for teachers and peers. Then we can explore what we can do to communicate with them effectively and why it makes us emotionally uncomfortable when there is a response that is deemed socially inappropriate.

#5 Wu Li Heron

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Posted November 14 2016 - 03:54 PM

The newest evidence from epigentic studies of the brain seemed to indicate that our immune system is to a significant degree responsible for how social we become. This could reflect the scalar architecture of the brain which might display a four fold supersymmetry with autism spectrum representing one of four distinctive types of conscious awareness. It would mean an analog systems logic applies that can be built into such dolls as a sort of translator that can help them communicate better with others. The idea is also related to quorum sensing among cells where their sheer size determines their emergent behavior and bacteria might communicate with widely divergent species using translators they produce. Its all based on pattern matching and means autists might even develop their own unique linguistics and interfaces if researchers can help them develop their own unique brand of pattern matching.


Edited by Wu Li Heron, November 14 2016 - 03:56 PM.


#6 aoabai

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Posted November 14 2016 - 04:11 PM

People with autism get all the best things. So not fair. What perks do I get for my conditions, huh? Just kidding. It sounds cool. And I hope it works, but it doesn't conform the kiddos either. They are who they are. They just need to be functional, that's all.

Another thing, I feel like the robot should be soft. It looks hard. I'm thinking about that evil science experiment with the monkeys, and how they wanted the soft looking fake monkey mom, that didn't have food. Rather than the wired fake monkey mom that did have food. Gosh, that experiment was evil.

#7 youfreeme

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Posted November 14 2016 - 04:13 PM

I don't know about autism in depth nor do I have any science or medical degrees,but I do have some questions. I think that being able to read people's facial expressions naturally cues us as to what'sthe next appropriate response. Fear for example is expressed by one to alert another that their behavior is too aggressive. A smile with eye contact and nodding suggests that we should continue our conversation. A person can say yes while you are talking to them but be staring at the floor, have a grimmace, or change of inflection in the voice. These cues cannot be conveyed by a robot. Rather than trying to teach the autistic child to have "appropriate" social behaviors, we invest all the money for "fixing" these kids into counseling for care takers and loved ones, classes for teachers and peers. Then we can explore what we can do to communicate with them effectively and why it makes us emotionally uncomfortable when there is a response that is deemed socially inappropriate.

 

So wait, what was your question?






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