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Why Don't I Have A Decent Job Yet?




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#1 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 03:04 PM

I've been looking for a non-profit job since October.  I'm working with a job coach and recruiters.  I apply weekly.

 

Still nothing.

 

My resume is great, I have experience, I type 80 WPM, I speak Spanish and Portuguese, and I went to a top university.

 

What gives?


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#2 quark

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Posted February 09 2016 - 04:09 PM

I've gathered that you have an undergraduate degree from previous posts (correct me if I'm wrong). There are simply not as many options available to those with that level of education. The institution is essentially irrelevant when it comes to undergrad studies. (depending on your career goals this can differ...)

 

I often feel like a "cheater" or "faker" among the children of lawyers, doctors, and other reputably employed alumni of the school I attend. There are students which romanticize the idea of earning a four year degree and then living a champagne lifestyle while working in the field that they had always hoped to pursue. 

 

You need to choose your own level of involvement. 

 

I would assume (and this could be totally wrong) that most non-profits would rely heavily on recommendations from within.


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#3 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 04:54 PM

I think you hit the nail on the head.  I only have a BA and it's only in English. 

 

That has to be it.

 

"You need to choose your own level of involvement."

 

What do you mean by that?

 

Do you recommend going back to school?  Or just getting a shitty part-time job and calling it a day?


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#4 Mr.Writer

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Posted February 09 2016 - 05:10 PM

First be prepared to keep looking for much, much longer.  After graduating college I searched unsuccessfully for a job in my field for 2 years and still haven't found one.  I graduated top of my school, won various awards, was the first name on everyone's tongue as far as achievers go, etc , etc.  Zip.  Doesn't matter.  The job market is a beast of its own, and the sad truth is that the scholastic world does an awful, awful job of preparing us for it, even at the level of college/university.

 

I finally got a job, and full time at that (VERY LUCKY) which is like 50% in my field and 50% in a field i have experience with.

 

BTW during those 2 years I applied more or less daily to multiple positions.  This includes going in person and shaking hands.  The job market is absolutely saturated, even for specific fields; My doctor friend tells me that MD's don't mean shit anymore, nobody will hire you "just" for being a doctor.  You need an MD AND a PhD preferably, but Masters will do, lol!

 

With a general degree like English you really have to ask what exact skills do you have on offer; if it comes down to knowing how to enjoy a good book and typing at a decent speed . . . best of luck to you.  Seek more skills, because you're not going to get a job you can retire at handed to you for knowing how to type.  Think about this new generation; 12 year olds can type this fast now.  What do you have that really makes you stand out from all the other undergrad english folk looking for an upgrade from mcdonalds?

 

If you don't volunteer somewhere, please start yesterday.  Volunteering is the new gateway to jobs . . . it serves the dual purpose of looking great on your resume and of getting your foot into the door of an organization or at least getting your name known.  It's also amazing personal experience, health boosting (really), and a free source of real world job skills.

 

I speak three languages too :D  that's another skill that is becoming a dime a dozen in this multicultural world . . .


Edited by Mr.Writer, February 09 2016 - 05:12 PM.

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#5 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 05:33 PM

Thanks.  That's another problem: I don't have enough competitive skills.

 

I think I should pursue a job as an admin, but that could take two years like it did with you!

 

Going back to school is starting to seem like the only viable option.  Maybe for an MSW?


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#6 I'minmyunderwear

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Posted February 09 2016 - 05:49 PM

what kind of non-profit are you interested in?

 

get a part time job there, or volunteer.  then when something opens up they'll know who you are and (hopefully) that you do good work.


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#7 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 05:58 PM

I'm interested in helping immigrants or women.

 

I'm currently volunteering at a non-profit that helps immigrants.

 

Thanks, IMMU.


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#8 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 06:15 PM

I could go back to school but I have no clue what I would study.  I was thinking MSW to be a social worker but that's a stressful, low paying job with a high burnout rate...

 

I could also just get a bunch of J.O.B's a volunteer until they hire me...

 

What do you all think?


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#9 Mr.Writer

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Posted February 09 2016 - 06:25 PM

My career plan is still to get an MSW one day; though I wouldn't be surprised if that never happens and I do something completely different.

 

I don't know what you mean by low paying . . . the college I went to pays their MSW school councelors 80-120k a year.  Yeah, the guys who help college students through depression and homework troubles.  120,000$ per year plus extensive benefits.  Ditto for hospital social workers.  I don't know if its different in the US, or what your salary expectations are; I personally consider 80k a year to be "retirement material", and would be just tickled to end my wage climb there.  Studies show that past 70k USD a year the returns on emotional happiness decline sharply.

 

The real problem is getting into an MSW program here; my top pick here has 2,000 applicants a year and they accept 20.  My grades weren't good enough, so I'll have to apply as a mature student with work experience, which then means that I'll need to have a pretty impressive CV to get anyone's attention and stand out from 2,000 applications.  It's also not a cheap program.

 

The burn out thing is personal and also greatly depends on which population you serve and where specifically you go; you can work with immigrants at a really shitty job/organization and be burnt in 4 months, or you can find the jackpot and work 40 years with immigrants.

 

The most important thing is that you enjoy what you do and it fulfills you.


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#10 TheSamantha

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Posted February 09 2016 - 07:24 PM

Thanks again.  I really think I should pursue an MSW, especially since I don't have many competitive skills...


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#11 quark

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Posted February 09 2016 - 10:03 PM

"You need to choose your own level of involvement.

 

What do you mean by that?

 

Do you recommend going back to school?  Or just getting a shitty part-time job and calling it a day?

 

Sometimes there is a level of self-entitlement that comes attached with a university degree. There are people that honestly think a job will fall into their lap (I'm not saying that you are). You've already begun by volunteering. If it doesn't work, you'll move onto something else.

 

As for going back to school, yes. Not just for the credentials, but because you may make a few connections.

 

Have you ever thought of teaching English abroad? (not as a career, just to pump up your resume)



#12 r0llinstoned

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Posted February 09 2016 - 10:12 PM

You could always move to Chatsworth

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#13 Karen J

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Posted February 10 2016 - 08:20 AM

In this job market, I can't imagine why any employer would seriously consider hiring somebody without experience in a similar or identical position.  It just isn't necessary.  When I have an opening, I usually have at least 50 people with significant experience apply for it.  I haven't hired an inexperienced applicant in nine years.


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#14 I'minmyunderwear

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Posted February 10 2016 - 03:52 PM

In this job market, I can't imagine why any employer would seriously consider hiring somebody without experience in a similar or identical position.  It just isn't necessary.  When I have an opening, I usually have at least 50 people with significant experience apply for it.  I haven't hired an inexperienced applicant in nine years.

 

move out of the big city and it becomes near impossible to find a qualified applicant for anything.  after my last promotion, it took me 6 months to find a decent replacement.

 

obviously it also makes a difference what field you're in.



#15 youfreeme

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Posted February 10 2016 - 04:00 PM

move out of the big city and it becomes near impossible to find a qualified applicant for anything.  after my last promotion, it took me 6 months to find a decent replacement.

 

obviously it also makes a difference what field you're in.

 

We also struggle to find people in my field, we can't hire fast enough, honestly.  It just depends on the field, like you said.



#16 TheSamantha

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Posted February 10 2016 - 05:11 PM

There's also two issues:

 

1.  I have a commitment to my volunteer gig

2.  I want to travel before being locked into two-week vacations

 

So I'm thinking I should just do anything part-time, save up, travel, and then go back to school in five years for an MSW.

 

?


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#17 TheSamantha

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Posted February 10 2016 - 05:12 PM

We also struggle to find people in my field, we can't hire fast enough, honestly.  It just depends on the field, like you said.

 

Ooh, what field?


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#18 orison

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Posted February 10 2016 - 05:18 PM

the world needs ditch diggers too..


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#19 Karen J

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Posted February 10 2016 - 06:03 PM

move out of the big city and it becomes near impossible to find a qualified applicant for anything. 

 

Most of the small towns in this state have lost all their good jobs in every field.


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#20 youfreeme

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Posted February 11 2016 - 03:27 PM

There's also two issues:

 

1.  I have a commitment to my volunteer gig

2.  I want to travel before being locked into two-week vacations

 

So I'm thinking I should just do anything part-time, save up, travel, and then go back to school in five years for an MSW.

 

?

 

School social work might be right up your alley.  You get to do some good and get summers and vacations off.






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