Jump to content


Click to shop at Royal Queen Seeds
Photo
- - - - -

What Do You Think Of A New Age Grunge Style Of Music

Grunge Rock Grunge Music



  • Please log in to reply
94 replies to this topic

#1 WillieNelson55

WillieNelson55

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • LocationSoutheastern Ohio

Posted November 19 2015 - 08:38 AM

What do you think of the idea of a new era of grunge music. Is grunge really dead or do you think grunge music could make a comeback?



#2 Reverand JC

Reverand JC

    Willy Fuckin' Wonka

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,040 posts

Posted November 19 2015 - 02:10 PM

"Grunge" never really existed. It was a term invented by critics and marketing men to sell a type of punk/hard rock in the mid 90s.

 

C/S,

Rev J 


  • Theprodu likes this

"I believe that creative imagination rules the universe.
I believe in the beauty of first love and the eternal power of all love.
I believe in dreams and dreamers, being one myself.
I believe in the power of modern medicine and the wisdom of ancient medicine as well.
I believe in the power of laughter and the beauty of a good joke." Willie Nelson


#3 MeAgain

MeAgain

    Dazed and Confused

  • Super Moderator
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,672 posts
  • LocationDobbstown, Malaysia

Posted November 19 2015 - 02:44 PM

It sucked the first time around.


HYZx5b8.gif

 

"Acclinis Falsis Animus Meliora Recusat"

(A mind that is charmed by false appearances refuses better things.)

~ Horace

 

 


#4 neonspectraltoast

neonspectraltoast

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,439 posts

Posted November 19 2015 - 03:42 PM

I think there will one day be a band that doesn't suck, and they will play electric guitars.  Critics will wonder if it's grunge, but in the end they'll come up with something new to label it, since we will all be on the cutting edge as always.  



#5 quark

quark

    Just another freak in the freak kingdom

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 398 posts

Posted November 20 2015 - 11:21 AM

What do you think of the idea of a new era of grunge music. Is grunge really dead or do you think grunge music could make a comeback?

 

A grunge parody band (like Steel Panther/Heavy Metal) would be funny... Or maybe depressing.... Who knows, it didn't last long enough to really make much of an impact besides loose fitting plaid shirts.



#6 Reverand JC

Reverand JC

    Willy Fuckin' Wonka

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,040 posts

Posted November 21 2015 - 02:17 AM

And it got a junkie with mediocre songwriting skills stringing together gibberish like English was his second language elevated to godlike status.

C/S,
Rev J
  • Theprodu and Mallyboppa like this

"I believe that creative imagination rules the universe.
I believe in the beauty of first love and the eternal power of all love.
I believe in dreams and dreamers, being one myself.
I believe in the power of modern medicine and the wisdom of ancient medicine as well.
I believe in the power of laughter and the beauty of a good joke." Willie Nelson


#7 Irminsul

Irminsul

    Valkyrie

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 15,852 posts
  • LocationBavaria, Deutschland

Posted November 21 2015 - 02:20 AM

Wicked Slam Death Metal :punk:
Red, white, black are our true colours
For these colours we will fight!
Red, white, black will crush the enemy
And will bring back what is right!

#8 notrick

notrick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 137 posts

Posted November 29 2015 - 01:46 AM

Profesional opinion as a sound engineer wheather running a live sound board and gators full of good tech it's just imposable to make even 1/2 the people happy--but Nirvana and pearl Jam jam were like that for years----so who knows.  I've mixed a few songs and to say frustrating would be generous.  But's often the case.  Mixing for a master comes out better in my opinion.

It's been around in Europe, Scandinavia the Balkans for a looong time and I've only recently talked to some producers in NYC there who say it will never cross the country.  "The Bands think they'er gods."

We'll Pretty much all Rock thought that.  The difference is Rock from 60s 70s 80s 90s 2000+ that are successful are very good muscians, work well together, most know multipul instruments, and theory.  All know keys and modes and can change keys on a dime -- without thinking.  They love music and thats it. they'er not in  it just for the money weman cool toys hot guys---they'er in it for the music.

You'll still find Stephen Stills, or Jackson Brown Bonnie Raitt up until sunrise with $700 headphones or plugs jaming to back tracks, adding drum riffs, or bass solo's 7 to 20 hours sometimes.  Sometimes obsessing on a song, sometimes just nuddleing.

 

One of the best guitar teacher I ever met said "practice till your fingers bleed then wook on piano till they heal.


Edited by notrick, November 29 2015 - 01:56 AM.


#9 Chodpa

Chodpa

    -=Chop_Chop=-

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,192 posts

Posted December 27 2015 - 05:48 PM

new age

grunge

 

you must mean seefeel


:sunny:

#10 Wizardofodd

Wizardofodd

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,587 posts

Posted December 28 2015 - 09:04 PM

new age

grunge

 

you must mean seefeel

 

Well....I watched that whole video and I certainly wouldn't call it grunge. Maybe New Age and even jammy in it's own way. I think it's ok for what it is, cool to hear and may even be fun to jam on. But two things I noticed.....first....there is almost zero reaction from the crowd except for the few super heady bros up front who probably can lecture everyone else on what it means to really "get it". Second...they cut the jams from one song to the next or the beginnings and endings of songs for this video. If this is the reaction from the crowd on what they thought was good enough to keep....either the rest of the music was really a drag or the drugs in the crowd were incredible...which is a realistic possibility. 



#11 Vanilla Gorilla

Vanilla Gorilla

    Go Ape

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,317 posts
  • LocationDown Under

Posted December 28 2015 - 11:54 PM

And it got a junkie with mediocre songwriting skills stringing together gibberish like English was his second language elevated to godlike status.
C/S,
Rev J


Everyone did go nuts for Nevermind, one of those times when everyone you knew was playing the same album for a period of about 6 months or so

Mediocre song writing skills?, album was full of catchy tunes, all of which Im totally sick of now...but back in the day.....

Anyhoo, "Grunge" was pretty much only one album by one band

#12 guerillabedlam

guerillabedlam

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,636 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted December 29 2015 - 01:55 AM

Grunge seems like it was primarily a product of the times. I cannot really see music in the age of social media and potentially professional production equipment on their home computer, have the same sort of self loathing quality as grunge, without sounding contrived.

Perhaps some aspects of it will continue to be utilized though.

Edited by guerillabedlam, December 29 2015 - 01:59 AM.

oYIBnFT.png

 


#13 Mallyboppa

Mallyboppa

    Nails Mc Fugger

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,040 posts
  • LocationRuncorn GB

Posted December 29 2015 - 02:04 AM

I Dont Like labels On Music

 

 


Edited by Mallyboppa, December 29 2015 - 02:05 AM.


#14 Chodpa

Chodpa

    -=Chop_Chop=-

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,192 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 05:24 AM

Well....I watched that whole video and I certainly wouldn't call it grunge. Maybe New Age and even jammy in it's own way. I think it's ok for what it is, cool to hear and may even be fun to jam on. But two things I noticed.....first....there is almost zero reaction from the crowd except for the few super heady bros up front who probably can lecture everyone else on what it means to really "get it". Second...they cut the jams from one song to the next or the beginnings and endings of songs for this video. If this is the reaction from the crowd on what they thought was good enough to keep....either the rest of the music was really a drag or the drugs in the crowd were incredible...which is a realistic possibility. 

 

Seefeel were an ambient band but they mostly use a conventional rock combo with some looping - I have a bootleg, or did before that external HD crashed from France were some French guy goes berserk telling them how bad they are. It's pretty funny. I learned about them a long long time ago now from the United States of Ambience compilation.  Their vibe is like being in the womb with all the physical burbles and gating veins and heartbeats, or that's what I think. They are my single favorite ambient trance band.  They would be what people used to call 'Chill-out.'


:sunny:

#15 Asmo

Asmo

    Slo motion rider

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,668 posts
  • LocationThe pulsing cavern

Posted December 29 2015 - 07:39 AM

It can't be brought back. Nevermind and some Pearl Jam stuff were the highlights of this (at best sub-)genre in rock. To me it can all be thrown in in the 'alternative rock' genre that got big in the 90's, but it can't be denied there are some distinctives that set bands like Nirvana and Pearl jam etc. apart from other typical 90's rock of course. Stil, these distinctive characteristics can now also occasionaly be found in different styles in the rock genre so yeah.


Posted Image


#16 guerillabedlam

guerillabedlam

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 20,636 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted December 29 2015 - 07:44 AM

Dirt by Alice in Chains is another  album that was a highlight of Grunge


  • Chodpa, Tyrsonswood and Peaceful_LotusFlower like this

oYIBnFT.png

 


#17 soulcompromise

soulcompromise

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,413 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 07:49 AM

I think it's very possible that grunge will make a second appearance, but it might not be for a few years. Not sure what "new age" grunge would be though. 


Edited by soulcompromise, December 29 2015 - 07:50 AM.

Posted Image

#18 Asmo

Asmo

    Slo motion rider

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,668 posts
  • LocationThe pulsing cavern

Posted December 29 2015 - 09:15 AM

If some form of 'new age' grunge would come around I don't think it would even be called grunge. Grunge was a vague subgenre to begin with (one reason why it didn't last as long as most other subgenres) but it still had fairly clear characteristics. If those characteristics are not in it, or differ too much from 90's grunge it will not be a grunge revival at all, but a new (sub)genre that got inspired by grunge. Like dubstep was influenced by/took inspiration/indirectly emerged from dub but is no dub (for example).


Posted Image


#19 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 09:38 AM

Grunge never had any distinctive characteristic other than watered down, poorly executed riffs borrowed from 60's and 70's rock with whiny, angst ridden lyrics and droning melodys plopped on top.

 

Mass marketing was the only thing that got grunge it's own record slot, separate from 'Alternative' which pretty much covered all no-talent charlatans demonstrating aural disdain for the higher art form.



#20 Asmo

Asmo

    Slo motion rider

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,668 posts
  • LocationThe pulsing cavern

Posted December 29 2015 - 10:28 AM

Lol, seems like you're the one with disdain for a certain art form here. 


Posted Image


#21 neonspectraltoast

neonspectraltoast

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,439 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 10:53 AM

Grunge never had any distinctive characteristics because, like punk and rock and roll in general, it was a label given to an explosion of individualism.  When music becomes elitist, it is no longer the highest art form.  It's just the proverbial plug stuck up the artists' ass.



#22 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 12:03 PM

Grunge never had any distinctive characteristics because, like punk and rock and roll in general, it was a label given to an explosion of individualism.  When music becomes elitist, it is no longer the highest art form.  It's just the proverbial plug stuck up the artists' ass.

What was so individual about it?  What music do you call elitist?



#23 Reverand JC

Reverand JC

    Willy Fuckin' Wonka

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,040 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 12:05 PM

Everyone did go nuts for Nevermind, one of those times when everyone you knew was playing the same album for a period of about 6 months or so

Mediocre song writing skills?, album was full of catchy tunes, all of which Im totally sick of now...but back in the day.....

Anyhoo, "Grunge" was pretty much only one album by one band

 

Every Nirvana tune in a nutshell:

 

Mumbled verse in Eminor

 

Screamed Chorus in GMajor

 

Add some references to disease, guns and depression in the lyrics.

 

Read this genius couplet out loud and see how much sense it makes:

 

"Load up on guns and bring your friends,

It's fun to lose and to pretend,

I'm overboard,

And self assured,

Oh no I know a dirty word."

 

I could go on and on about this drivel.

 

I think Nirvana would have just been a footnote if Cobain didn't paint the walls with his brains.

 

C/S,

Rev J


  • Theprodu likes this

"I believe that creative imagination rules the universe.
I believe in the beauty of first love and the eternal power of all love.
I believe in dreams and dreamers, being one myself.
I believe in the power of modern medicine and the wisdom of ancient medicine as well.
I believe in the power of laughter and the beauty of a good joke." Willie Nelson


#24 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 12:06 PM

Lol, seems like you're the one with disdain for a certain art form here. 

Oh, you're a perceptive one!

 

I wouldn't call it an art form though, just bad pop music.



#25 neonspectraltoast

neonspectraltoast

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,439 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 03:06 PM

 

 

What was so individual about it?  What music do you call elitist?

 

I think maybe you guys perceive grunge as being some form of music.  In my mind, it more refers to the scene at the time, though we can split hairs about that, I suppose.  Beck was a part of that scene.  Weezer was a part of that scene.  Green Day was a part of that scene.  Hell, even the Cranberries were a part of that scene.  There was no formula.  And most of the bands didn't think of themselves as grunge.  Nirvana thought of themselves as a punk band.  So criticize NIrvana for being simplistic, but they weren't trying to be musical geniuses.  Some people call them musical geniuses.  Maybe they are right.  Maybe they are wrong.  

 

Like Nirvana or not, whatever.  If you want to, deny that the scene was defined by the label "grunge."  Okay.  But the scene did exist, and as far as the scene goes, it was unified, and it wasn't unified by any one particular style of music.  There were punk bands, there were folk artists, there were industrial bands breaking new ground. 

I call it elitist when someone likes a particular style of music, so they lump everything else in a category of "not really being music."  I hate Nickelback, but I won't seriously accuse them of not being, technically, music.  What is music if not something that frees the spirit, and who is to say whose spirit can be freed by what?  Okay, so we're all guilty of having various degrees of intelligence and various different bands will be able to liberate us depending on what our intelligence level may be.  Some artists are for dumb people, and some artists are for really smart people.  So I'll admit, maybe I'm dumber than you for liking Nirvana, a lot, which I do, but it's what gets my creative juices flowing.  If Nirvana was really good at promoting individuality, which I think they were, Kurt Cobain was a fierce individualist, then I think their music was really good at freeing people's spirits, which is what good music does, and which is probably why people call them musical geniuses.  

 

Even if you have
Even if you need
I don't mean to stare
We don't have to breed
We could plant a house
We could build a tree
I don't even care
We could have all three

 

INDIVIDUALITY.  That was the message.  That's what people were excited about at the time.  Though yeah, we can get into whether technically that's what we're talking about when we're talking about grunge.  But to speak of "grunge" in terms of a particular formula of music and forget about what the scene was really like at the time is a disservice.  


Edited by neonspectraltoast, December 29 2015 - 03:08 PM.


#26 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 03:31 PM

I just never got into the 'attitude' part of any music scene. I didn't listen to rock music to piss off my parents or as a protest on greater society, or as a release of teen angst. (In fact I rarely paid any attention to the content of rock lyrics, just the melody and syllabic cadence) I just liked the music. And when rock music seemed to become more about attitude than musical substance...well, that turned me off. Punk music I was like, ok, whatever, these guys don't care about sounding good, they prefer to sound offensive. But the new punk and grunge made a slicker form of mainstream 'punk', and ended up crucified by their peers when they made it big. Ha, they became the rockstars they once hated! Ain't karma a bitch



#27 Guest_xenxan

Guest_xenxan
  • Guests

Posted December 29 2015 - 04:50 PM

I think maybe you guys perceive grunge as being some form of music.  In my mind, it more refers to the scene at the time, though we can split hairs about that, I suppose.  Beck was a part of that scene.  Weezer was a part of that scene.  Green Day was a part of that scene.  Hell, even the Cranberries were a part of that scene.  There was no formula.  And most of the bands didn't think of themselves as grunge.  Nirvana thought of themselves as a punk band.  So criticize NIrvana for being simplistic, but they weren't trying to be musical geniuses.  Some people call them musical geniuses.  Maybe they are right.  Maybe they are wrong.  

 

Like Nirvana or not, whatever.  If you want to, deny that the scene was defined by the label "grunge."  Okay.  But the scene did exist, and as far as the scene goes, it was unified, and it wasn't unified by any one particular style of music.  There were punk bands, there were folk artists, there were industrial bands breaking new ground. 

I call it elitist when someone likes a particular style of music, so they lump everything else in a category of "not really being music."  I hate Nickelback, but I won't seriously accuse them of not being, technically, music.  What is music if not something that frees the spirit, and who is to say whose spirit can be freed by what?  Okay, so we're all guilty of having various degrees of intelligence and various different bands will be able to liberate us depending on what our intelligence level may be.  Some artists are for dumb people, and some artists are for really smart people.  So I'll admit, maybe I'm dumber than you for liking Nirvana, a lot, which I do, but it's what gets my creative juices flowing.  If Nirvana was really good at promoting individuality, which I think they were, Kurt Cobain was a fierce individualist, then I think their music was really good at freeing people's spirits, which is what good music does, and which is probably why people call them musical geniuses.  

 

Even if you have
Even if you need
I don't mean to stare
We don't have to breed
We could plant a house
We could build a tree
I don't even care
We could have all three

 

INDIVIDUALITY.  That was the message.  That's what people were excited about at the time.  Though yeah, we can get into whether technically that's what we're talking about when we're talking about grunge.  But to speak of "grunge" in terms of a particular formula of music and forget about what the scene was really like at the time is a disservice.  

 

The last statement paints it perfectly.

 

Personally, Nirvana were overrated. I never did take to them. Although I was and still am a big fan of Soundgarden, who kind of sailed under the radar in the early days; even to a point where Chris Cornell rarely gets any or very little credit as one of the best singer songwriters then and now.

 

"Grunge" always seem to be the combination of Punk, ala Black Flag: SamHain: Misfits and of the Heavier sounds of Sabbath:Saxon and Zep.

 

Like Toast says, 'Grunge' was and still is the identity of the times.

 

Now music just plain isn't there. Too many one and done. Make a quick buck, find someone younger, more obscene to replace the last. Talent is no longer part of or required in the music industry today.



#28 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 29 2015 - 05:24 PM

I like Cornell.


  • scratcho likes this

#29 Asmo

Asmo

    Slo motion rider

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,668 posts
  • LocationThe pulsing cavern

Posted December 30 2015 - 05:16 AM

I prefer Nevermind above Soundgarden, most of Pearl Jam and basically everything else that is considered grunge. But the album kind of grew on me and grunge is not spend well on me at all anyway. Just because it makes use of simple formulas and techniques doesn't make the songs less great (some would argue that it's on the contrary :P) and it also doesn't make the musicians involved untalented. Like Neonspectraltoast says: they really weren't trying to be musical geniuses. Hey maybe they were trying to make it big (as opposed to their or Cobain's image I guess) but they were doing it in their own way in their own unique style that sounded new and refreshing at the time and lots of people loved it (and apparently still do).


Posted Image


#30 Theprodu

Theprodu

    Modus Lascivious

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,696 posts

Posted December 30 2015 - 06:47 AM

I prefer Nevermind  Hey maybe they were trying to make it big (as opposed to their or Cobain's image I guess) but they were doing it in their own way in their own unique style that sounded new and refreshing at the time and lots of people loved it (and apparently still do).

Riiight...hate to pop your fantasy but...

 

 

wiki

Nevermind became a huge commercial success, selling millions of copies and popularizing the Seattle grunge movement and alternative rock in general.[4] However, all three members of Nirvana—singer and guitarist Kurt Cobain, bassist Krist Novoselic, and drummer Dave Grohl—later expressed dissatisfaction with the sound of the album, citing its production as too polished.

 

Early in 1992, Cobain told Rolling Stone that he was sure that the band's next album would showcase "both of the extremes" of its sound, saying "it'll be more raw with some songs and more candy pop on some of the others. It won't be as one-dimensional [as Nevermind]".

 

Nirvana ultimately chose Albini to record its third album

Although he considered the group to be "R.E.M. with a fuzzbox" and "an unremarkable version of the Seattle sound", Albini told Nirvana biographer Michael Azerrad he accepted because he felt sorry for the band members, whom he perceived to be "the same sort of people as all the small-fry bands I deal with", at the mercy of their record company.

Albini instituted a strict policy of ignoring everyone except for the band members; the producer explained that everyone associated with the group aside from the musicians themselves were "the biggest pieces of shit I ever met"

 

Cobain originally wanted to name the album I Hate Myself and I Want to Die, a phrase that had originated in his journals in mid-1992. At the time, the singer used the phrase as a response whenever someone asked him how he was doing. Cobain intended the album title as a joke; he stated he was "tired of taking this band so seriously and everyone else taking it so seriously"

 

 

Cobain was obviously a fucking puke, and not only didn't care about quality or musicianship, didn't care about the band. He wasn't being an individual, he was just a fucked up kid throwing a temper tantrum, you could hear it in his voice, you could see it in his demeanor. And all his fans could relate with that apparently. It's just sickening


Edited by Theprodu, December 30 2015 - 06:47 AM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Grunge Rock, Grunge, Music

Click to shop at In Harmony Herbs and Spice