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The Downside of Home School.




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#1 PhotoDude

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Posted January 07 2013 - 09:32 AM

Please keep in mind that this is just from my point of view of interacting with my own friends whom were home schooled.

Now I know all about the benefits of home schooling, and I support any parent who wishes to go this route. With that said, almost all the people I've met that were home schooled have a lot of social issues. They are almost all very shy, and don't interact well with others outside their family. With the exception of my one friend, they are all very smart (sorry buddy) and usually very creative, but have very few friends.

Personally, I think it's the lack of socializing that you get from public/private school that a person's social skills are developed.

Any thoughts?

#2 TAZER-69

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Posted January 07 2013 - 09:35 AM

I have to disagree with you. My daughter was home schooled by her mom and she is anything but shy or non-interactive, in fact she is very socialble and out going.
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#3 Maelstrom

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Posted January 07 2013 - 09:36 AM

Socialization is certainly the main downfall of homeschooling.

Another one, at least from my perspective, is the fact that most kids who are schooled at home are done so for religious reasons, wanting to keep God and creation science in their daily lives where they cannot find it at public school. The religious angle tends to make them very ignorant and very easy targets when they enter college life and the real world.

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#4 orison

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Posted January 07 2013 - 10:00 AM

Smoking in the boys room just isnt the same..
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#5 Eavesdrop

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Posted January 07 2013 - 10:24 AM

I know kids who were bullied at school who ended up with social phobia as adults as a result.

#6 jamgrassphan

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Posted January 07 2013 - 10:26 AM

I think home schooling is only as good as the educator (the same could be said for publc or private schools). I know one particular case personally of a parental unit that is collectively unfit to train a dog, and I'm absolutely horrified by the train wreck I see in the not to do distant future when their daughter finally goes off to college. I predict a full on nervous breakdown inside of the first semester of her higher education - not because she will be unprepared for the coursework, but because she will not be able to reconcile the education she has received with the diversity of ideas she will be faced with, all at once, the first time she receives peer criticism on her course work. She has been robbed of the ability to think, for herself, critically - not that the public school system is any bastion of free thought, but the fact is - public schools do provide a student with a variety of different teachers, with different world views and those views do get presented to students through subtle osmosis in the way that official materials get presented.
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#7 Isadoran

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Posted January 19 2013 - 12:34 PM

I home schooled both my children. My daughter got brainwashed by several family members that I was depriving her education. In her teens it caused a total rebellion. Now when she entered college and she had to take the entrance exam she excelled. She stopped by my home and thanked me for reading to her every day the whole time she was a kid.

Now my 18 year old son gets in my face about depriving their education. He chose to go to high school his last year of school and is doing quite well and he is quite popular but he is doing well which means if he was deprived he would be behind.

Home schooling is a hard job and you will always have people telling you you are making a mistake. This year there was a gun threat at my sons school and the thing that ran through my head is at least he was safe at home. He always had friends and a social life.

There are many home schooling websites online and curriculum. The whole time I home schooled we used the Internet for many of our teaching tools.

#8 Isadoran

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Posted January 19 2013 - 12:37 PM

I think home schooling is only as good as the educator (the same could be said for publc or private schools). I know one particular case personally of a parental unit that is collectively unfit to train a dog, and I'm absolutely horrified by the train wreck I see in the not to do distant future when their daughter finally goes off to college. I predict a full on nervous breakdown inside of the first semester of her higher education - not because she will be unprepared for the coursework, but because she will not be able to reconcile the education she has received with the diversity of ideas she will be faced with, all at once, the first time she receives peer criticism on her course work. She has been robbed of the ability to think, for herself, critically - not that the public school system is any bastion of free thought, but the fact is - public schools do provide a student with a variety of different teachers, with different world views and those views do get presented to students through subtle osmosis in the way that official materials get presented.


One struggle I had with public school is there are many abusive teachers who humiliate their students. My children were part Hispanic and were discriminated against. Which is why I home schooled them.

#9 verminous_plague

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Posted January 21 2013 - 05:45 PM

no, no and no. public school is where you get nervous and intimidated. if you are raised in a good family with respect and some discipline. when you go out into a job environment you should be already prepped for how adults interact. you see public school is throwing good kids in with bad, because some people are raised in households with no rules or discipline the kids go to school thinking it's socialize time and are disruptive and hurt the good kids learning environment. public school is a joke nowadays and the test scores show that. and the money going to public school is higher then ever and things are getting worse.

#10 verminous_plague

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Posted January 21 2013 - 05:48 PM

and besides they pester these children with things that are unnecessary for children to learn about. for example, sexual education. that is a parents responsibility. and it's inappropriate for 7th graders to hear about it. period. and they teach these kids all about racism when these kids shouldn't be hearing about civil rights at the age of 8. i'm sorry. parents are responsible and should be for informing their kids about life and responsibility and respect out side the home. public school is where the kids who don't have a good home go but the kids who have a stable home have no business being in a public school.

#11 Flower Fox

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Posted January 29 2013 - 07:24 AM

I am thinking about homeschooling one day, and i heard they have programs for kids to meet up to socialize like arts crafts sports etc.
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#12 LetLovinTakeHold

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Posted January 29 2013 - 07:42 AM

Smoking in the boys room just isnt the same..


....and being hot for teacher becomes a little weird

#13 Omnibook

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Posted April 28 2013 - 09:07 AM

I live near Houston, and there are a large number of local businesses that hold meetups for home schooled children durring the day. The kids get to learn programing, music, engineering, creative writing, etc, and it usually is very affordable.

#14 Victoria1987

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Posted May 13 2013 - 09:11 PM

Please keep in mind that this is just from my point of view of interacting with my own friends whom were home schooled.

Now I know all about the benefits of home schooling, and I support any parent who wishes to go this route. With that said, almost all the people I've met that were home schooled have a lot of social issues. They are almost all very shy, and don't interact well with others outside their family. With the exception of my one friend, they are all very smart (sorry buddy) and usually very creative, but have very few friends.

Personally, I think it's the lack of socializing that you get from public/private school that a person's social skills are developed.

Any thoughts?


This describes my partner quite well, actually. She was home schooled by her mother all the way through high school. She was bullied horribly in middle school, and her psychologist and her parents thought it was best to get her out of that situation.

She's still very shy, very smart, very creative (she's an artist and a writer) and quite socially awkward. But she's very good at making friends and quite sociable, provided that it's on her own terms. She picked up those social skills just fine in college.

But I do see your point about socialization. That is a downfall of home schooling, but it's a trade off. Home schooled kids tend to get better educations, and many of them do have active social lives. They just have to want those social lives. When I was in public high school, it was forced on me. I probably wouldn't have had that if I was home schooled.

#15 LadyAvenger

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Posted May 17 2013 - 05:06 PM

Please keep in mind that this is just from my point of view of interacting with my own friends whom were home schooled.

Now I know all about the benefits of home schooling, and I support any parent who wishes to go this route. With that said, almost all the people I've met that were home schooled have a lot of social issues. They are almost all very shy, and don't interact well with others outside their family. With the exception of my one friend, they are all very smart (sorry buddy) and usually very creative, but have very few friends.

Personally, I think it's the lack of socializing that you get from public/private school that a person's social skills are developed.

Any thoughts?


This is both true and false. I home school my son. (Actually technically, it's "unschooling" for how I teach. He's actually learning this way.) This isn't what it is supposed to be. There's no reason for it. My son is EXTREMELY social. It's embarrassing to homeschoolers.

I have an eight year old and I have a lot of experiencing in tutoring children with disabilities also. My son, who I homeschool is in preschool/kindergarten. My daughter goes to school. My son is learning the alphabet faster and at four will even be starting writing in a couple of weeks. (That's early.)

Even though your kid is homeschooled, that doesn't mean they're meant to be locked up in a cage from the world. My son, while being taught at home we have a simple fix for social activity. It's called gymnastics, swimming, baseball, karate, whatever he chooses.

Gymnastics classes for him are ONLY $40 a month. It's easy.

#16 kurona

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Posted September 30 2013 - 07:50 AM

i never really thought school was about the grades. that was half of it maybe or less... its more about getting used to working in an environment with other people going for the same thing or their own. similar to how life is after school.

you face a biased crap of a teacher... no different from a boss later. you have assholes as classmates, no different from coworkers. friend pressure and distractions - again, same thing. that thing, to be able to keep focus... thats what some people miss. things that are not really there at home.

esp for aspies and hfa... you learn by pattern and observation, without anything to observe how can you adapt. i am one actually. i can only imagine it being much much harder, if i didnt get to experience school.

being able to do something isnt just about knowing how to do it, but being able to do it in different environments and variables

what you learn, is how 'you' would approach things, your way. what skills you do have and what you dont. the pressure of being left behind... the pressure. and working with it or around it.

and out there too... I just talked to an HR person, and this is well known. Its not how proficient you are, its how well you fit in to the team - how functional you are IN a team.

#17 drumminmama

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Posted October 03 2013 - 12:46 PM

I think homeschooled, socialized children can function on teams as adults.
But the parents have to encourage and even push their kids.
Challenge is good.

I know of programs where the kids who are home schooled can be in the extracurricular programs at the public schools. The school gets body counts for funding, the families get a few more options. Like debate club, theater, even shop and vocational classes.

Neat idea.
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#18 Voyage

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Posted October 03 2013 - 02:07 PM

Personally, I think it's the lack of socializing that you get from public/private school that a person's social skills are developed.

Any thoughts?


this kind of socializing?

The Department of Education and the Department of Justice say that 1,183,700 violent crimes were committed at American public schools during the 2009-2010 school year, but that only 303,900 of these violent crimes were reported to the police.
By this government estimate, 879,800 violent crimes committed at U.S. public schools in the 2009-2010 school year were not reported to police.

These statistics are part of a report—“Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2011”—published jointly on Feb. 22 by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).

- See more at: http://cnsnews.com/n...h.PScqWjIL.dpuf



http://www.bjs.gov/i...detail&iid=2295



ARTICLE: NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND FAILS THE REALITY TEST FOR INNER-CITY SCHOOLS: A VIEW FROM THE TRENCHES

For the last seventeen years, I have had the privilege of working with parents, students, teachers, social service providers, community activists, and others, all committed to improving public schools in my community. During the last eight years, I have observed the application of the No Child Left Behind statute (NCLB). 2 Despite its obvious beneficial premise, NCLB is just not working - at least not for inner-city schools.

According to a recent report by the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, 30% of all American students do not graduate from high school. 3 For the predominantly minority students living in large cities, the statistics are even worse. 4 Only one-half, 52%, of students in the nation's fifty largest cities graduate from high school, and in four large metropolitan areas (Baltimore, Cleveland, Detroit, and Indianapolis), fewer than 35% of the students graduate. 5 The report is aptly named, "Cities in Crisis." 6

Another study, conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins, describes 1,700 (12%) of the regular or vocational high schools nationwide as "dropout factories." 7 The term, coined by researcher Bob Balfanz, refers to schools where at least 40% of the entering freshmen fail to graduate with their senior class. 8 Not surprisingly, the study found that most dropout factories are concentrated in large cities, with mostly minority populations or in high-poverty rural areas.


https://litigation-e...6ec580f3d70900c

the thing with the socialization discussions is that they usually start with the premise that somehow homeschooled kids are locked up in a closet at home.

the question is, what do you consider socialization? having your children out interacting in the world with family, friends and your community... or locked up in an institution?

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#19 www5556

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Posted November 23 2013 - 03:00 AM

I don't see why not being able to social is bad, socializing is such a tedious, and desperate engagement.

The only downside I experienced was not getting proper treatment for my ADD.




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