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university is a waste of time




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#31 mugwande

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Posted October 25 2012 - 07:06 AM

Actualy where i come from we have a saying that "luck of education can only hate you when you grow up" we don't go to universty to get jobs but to get knowedge a know that you can you use to do something good in your life. There many things that someone can do if you don't focus on your qualifications but instead to do something better of your self.
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#32 Karen J

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Posted October 25 2012 - 07:31 AM

Like a few others have said, college is what you make of it.


If you go there wanting nothing but job skills, there's a good chance you will leave there without much else to show for your time. But it's also possible that you will encounter a professor or two who will open your mind to quite a bit more, in spite of your best efforts to resist. It's much better to show up without so many specific expectations, and see what develops.

Unfortunately, more and more students are having to work a lot of hours at a job and/or commute to class from home, due to financial necessity. That reduces your chances of getting more out of college than the basics. They aren't getting the complete experience.

I find it sad but not surprising that so many people who haven't been to college think they know so many reasons why it is worthless. This is a logical "catch 22" situation. If it was possible for everyone to fully understand the value of it without going there, then nobody would need to go there.

Sometimes, it is years later when you are able to look back on a particular educational experience and see what you gained from it.

Professors in various departments do have their own distinct perspectives, agendas, and biases. That's one of several reasons why you're required to take classes in a lot of different subject areas. Successful people have to learn how to deal with that kind of conflict and complexity. You learn that by doing it, not by reading about it. Also, the whole body of knowledge you come away with is greater than the sum of its parts.

This is a hard subject to talk about, because it's easy for some people to have the reaction, "You're saying that you're better than me, because I haven't been to college." And if I say to them, "No, I'm not better than you", then they can respond, "Then you didn't learn anything worthwhile in school." That isn't a useful conversation. It leads away from the main point.

Most importantly, what education gives you is a better mental tool box. I like that analogy, because everybody knows a tool of any kind can be used for something good or something bad, but you can always do more with better tools. Travel and work experience add more tools to your box. You can never have too many.
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#33 Grainpsilo

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Posted October 25 2012 - 11:27 AM

Society is obsessed with paper


You need a piece of paper to prove you were born, a paper to prove you can drive a car, to prove you are smart.

It is all meaningless but society dictates it and you cant change it.

You can fight the current your whole life and try to walk up stream facing constant resistance for no reason but your pride. Or you can play the game... lift up your feet and let the current carry you and shit will be alot easier.
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#34 Eye Contact

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Posted March 30 2013 - 09:44 PM

I kept throwing myself against the brickwall of higher eduction until, one day, I wanted to learn something. Stopped fighting it: took the required classes, read the required texts, wrote the required papers . . . And, by god, I learned stuff. Everytime something happens, I wish I was back in class discussing it.

#35 Mr.Writer

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Posted March 31 2013 - 10:37 AM

I went to university because it was expected of me. I drifted, lacked motivation, did not feel passionately about my program (or anything really) and it took me 8 years to complete a 4 year program, with a pretty average GPA. When I finished, it still didn't help me get a job. I worked minimum wage for 1 more year before I realized if I didn't change something soon, this would be my lot forever. I did NOT want to rise up through the corporate ladder in some retail chain.

I enrolled myself in college, am almost done my first semester, am near top of my class, have already made a name for myself among my peers, and have found my calling in life. 2 years ago I could have never predicted this would have happened, I thought I was going to either go into a life of crime or a life of mediocrity. Now I have purpose, vision, 1 year goals, 5 year goals, 20 year goals, life time goals . . . it just takes time. What really helped me was a loving girlfriend who sat my ass down and made me brainstorm til it hurt. What emerged from a dark cloud of "society sucks and I want no part in it" was actually, "society sucks and I possess exactly the skillset and motivation to fix it up a little". Never would have seen that coming.

I don't regret my university degree, as now it will put me above my peers when I search for a job after college. It also gave me a lot of background theoretical knowledge and prepared me for research papers and tests, something which again sets me above my peers in college.

Ultimately it will be combination of both which will fuel me into my professional life.

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#36 Eye Contact

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Posted March 31 2013 - 11:22 AM

Oh, yeah, forgot to mention: I like telling the clueless (not you . . .) that I went to college so that when they come to take us away, I want to be with the educated . . . who will be killed first before the others are put to slave labor.

#37 NatureDude

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Posted April 01 2013 - 11:52 PM

Society is obsessed with paper


You need a piece of paper to prove you were born, a paper to prove you can drive a car, to prove you are smart.

It is all meaningless but society dictates it and you cant change it.

You can fight the current your whole life and try to walk up stream facing constant resistance for no reason but your pride. Or you can play the game... lift up your feet and let the current carry you and shit will be alot easier.

My thoughts exactly

#38 Just_a_woman

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Posted May 25 2013 - 12:12 AM

I'm very positive about University, but it isn't for everybody. Many who come aren't made for it and get frustrated. There are other ways to work towards a good life, mainly if one lives in a wealthy country.

In my particular case and those of most people I know, a formal education made a big positive difference.

I do find it a shame some countries demand so much money of their students. I did uni for free, with library books and all. For postgraduate studies, I was paid to do them. From my third year at uni on, I was making a living out of it, doing research in parallel with my studies. Only good memories.

Students should demand free education.

#39 Omnibook

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Posted June 01 2013 - 05:32 PM

It is unfortunate that so many people in this thread are yelling "Do what I did! You will have the same results" or "Don't do what I did! You will make the same mistakes!"

Whether university is a good choice for an individual is a complex choice. There is always risk involved. My humble suggestion is to take whatever results you encounter and make the best of them, because nobody can predict what will happen in another's life.

#40 Sparkle155

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Posted January 17 2014 - 02:56 PM

If you want to work in healthcare it is not useless. I found a CNA job right away. But alas, I hated working with bodily fluids.

#41 IamnotaMan I AM THOR

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Posted January 18 2014 - 04:20 PM

Got your attention, did I? Yes, university is a waste of time if you want to be drilled to take tests and fit a mold... also the student loans aren't fun to pay back; and, most students don't deserve to be in college- I knew more intelligent people who did not go to college or university but got jobs and made something of themselves.

What road did I take? University. What road do I regret? You betcha!

Please do not bash me for saying university is a waste of time. I got wonderful grades and had a decent amount of friends when I was on campus; it just does not prepare you for the real world!

Does anyone else feel the same way? Given that I cannot even get a volunteer job because I have a M/A in this economy, I deserve to feel a little upset. I see mentally handicapped people with jobs and I am told I am overqualified? Geez. I suppose that is why our country is in the toilet.

From someone who has been down the higher education road, spend your time dedicating yourself to a field or company you can grow with and learn the trade. If you enjoy cooking, fixing cars, or chilling with people learn the vocation and become the best chef, mechanic, or counselor the world has ever seen. This goes for anything else that cannot be outsourced! Vocational training is the way to go. Don't spend your time with a four-year university or more. Get a real job. I wish someone would have told me this 10 years a go!


I remember getting my A level results (The exams you take which basically decide which uni you can get into). It was a really nice feeling, thinking that you have all these options open to you.

But after uni, I found jobs (in my sector at that time) were either filled by family connections/private high school connections etc, all that crap.
Or the jobs were normal jobs, where the interviewer was terrified you'd be HIS boss in 3 or 4 years time.

It all gave me a pretty flat feeling.

I wound up running my own businesses. Having got a degree rarely comes up in conversation, if ever. I used to think "law degree blah blah". Now I think, "what the fuck was that 3yrs for"...

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#42 dwight78

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Posted March 18 2014 - 09:18 PM

The purpose of higher education is not to get a job, that's a Tech school's role, or learn how to take orders, that's the military's role, or to become adapted to the real world, that's the family's role.

Higher education is intended to broaden your understanding of the world, present multiple ideas and teachings from many different cultures, teach you to think in non-dogmatic ways, and increase your understanding of society and the individuals that comprise it, including yourself.

Professors seem "liberal" to close minded individuals because they have been trained, and are willing to look at many different subjects, ideas, and notions from many different directions. Close minded people have decided that only one way is correct , their way.

The "piece of paper" or degree is not what is needed, what has been learned is what is needed. The degree is only a representation of what is supposed to have been learned.


Higher education is only a waste of time only if you enter it with false expectations. "I went to college to get a good job and make lots of money", is a false expectation. If you attend with the attitude that you will use the environment to increase your knowledge and improve your mind, and then make every attempt to do so, you will never loose, as you will have developed a strong mind and powerful will that can be used in whatever situation you find yourself in.

In short the purpose of higher education is to grow up.


While I get your point, I can assure you that in th internet age, that quality can also be obtained by reading lots of stuff from the internet.Many many people who go to university do not develop the qualities you enunciated. They just go there as a fulfillment of an expectation and to emerge with some certificate because an employer will be asking for that certificate.

In light of the availability of information through various sources in the 21st century I think it is time to re-evaluate what constitutes education

#43 MeAgain

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Posted March 20 2014 - 03:22 PM

While I get your point, I can assure you that in th internet age, that quality can also be obtained by reading lots of stuff from the internet.Many many people who go to university do not develop the qualities you enunciated. They just go there as a fulfillment of an expectation and to emerge with some certificate because an employer will be asking for that certificate.

In light of the availability of information through various sources in the 21st century I think it is time to re-evaluate what constitutes education

The problem with the internet is that you decide what to read.

The selective exposure theory is a concept in media and communication research that refers to individuals’ tendency to favor information that reinforces pre-existing views while avoiding contradictory information. In this theory people tend to select specific aspects of exposed information based on their perspective, beliefs, attitudes and decisions. People can determine the information exposed to them and select favorable evidence, while ignoring the unfavorable. This theory has been explored using the cognitive dissonance theory, which suggests information consumers strive for results of cognitive equilibrium. In order to attain this equilibrium, individuals may either reinterpret the information they are exposed to or select information that are consonant with their view.

I agree that educational methods and techniques should be constantly evaluated.

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#44 Sleeping Caterpillar

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Posted March 22 2014 - 09:15 AM

http://www.youtube.c...oXtddNPAM?t=42s
Damn link busted "And the people in the houses
All went to the university,
Where they were put in boxes
And they came out all the same"

I completely agree, however I would argue that certain professions benefit from a degree. particularly science and medical fields as access to a lab would be nigh impossible otherwise.

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#45 Sallysmart

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Posted March 22 2014 - 09:36 AM

The problem with the internet is that you decide what to read.

I agree that educational methods and techniques should be constantly evaluated.


True you do decide and that is where you can be smart where you like to be smart. The problem with school is they decide where you Should be smart and that's like saying we should all be the same, get the same marks and so on.
The school boards have discussed letting kids decide what they want to learn and I think it's In the works in some areas already. Supposedly math and English will stick but remember the days when women had to go to HomeEc and the boys had to go to shop class? That was changing when I was in school. Now some kids are able to ask for German as a second language class instead of French.
On the Internet you can pick what you like and even concentrate on it. If they taught me what I read on my own later in life I woulda been doing what I do now a long time ago because it interests me and I am good at it. Starting it on my own and reading and learning about it has made me understand it and realize my potential here and then I found what I love and will retire doing.
Sad thing is they taught me nothing of it in school, and even the Pros who study what I do have asked me if I'd consider working where they do,,, Nope, they read it in text and are only allowed to apply it as they read it in text, that would ruin all that I do well. Their certificates hold them back in my opinion.

Just call me Sally, I am not that smart, ;)


#46 Flaming Liberal

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Posted March 22 2014 - 09:50 AM

reading books and stuff on the internet is good, but it doesn't even come close to a replacing what you will learn taking a class at a university.

take for example if you wanted to teach yourself how to build furniture. you can learn a TON from reading books and looking at the internet, but if you have a master craftsman (equivalent of a scholar in academia) teaching you then you learn all that and so much more in a matter of no time in comparison.

it's the same way in school. you can teach yourself a little physics but damn its going to take you 10 times as long to do it yourself.

I can't imagine EVER learning some of the things i've learned in school on my own. you open a damn text book and its in a foreign language.

#47 Sallysmart

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Posted March 22 2014 - 10:42 AM

It would depend on what you like to do in your heart, some things could not be taught to ones self on their own, many things can. As far as building furniture. I was never taught that in school, but when I was divorcing my first husband I wanted to move out and a friend who was taking nursing needed help with rent, her and hubby were doing ok but sometimes tight, my rent helped them and to get things he needed done faster and bring in the cash faster I agreed since I wasn't working then, (in the process of deciding where to move) to work with him in the wood shop, he taught me to use the table saw, scroll saw, ban saw and do a whole lot of things I never thought I could do. After working with him I built my own rocking horse for a friends new baby, and made my own sweater box bench for the end of my bed. We made curio cabinets and pressed em out in short time and we both made a lot of money, at first, me being his Jo boy/Girl, then making stuff on my own while he was out selling it. This was something I could have carried on with but it wasn't really what I wanted to do even tho I as getting good at it. Sometimes life lessons and friends can teach us what we want to know.
I also learned how to work on my own cars, not taught to me in school, so my point is school is only a base line for the beginner as we all are, the Internet now is a great tool for getting started in what interests us as is life and time it's self. We can point ourselves and if school is what we need then so beit but not for everyone. Nursing,,, yup, doctors,,, yup, but many courses are bunk, a waste of time and money.
I remember a friend telling me she took some class in university, I dunno, business or something "What does that make you?" "Well I can work in a bank, become a police officer,,, yada,,, yada,,, yada,,,
Wow, lots of choices, none I would want. She ended up working in care for the disabled, that's good! but it didn't happen because of her course. I did that for several years without her course and made the same money. She loves her work.
My uncle was a school teacher, he now feeds and fends for his adult kid,,, who doesn't do anything but sucker his parents by hanging out at a collage on their dime to watch and play with girls, who is the smart one here? Someone's retirement is being sifted to nothing, and once it comes clear this kid doesn't want to pass a course and have a real job he will fend for him further. He now has a baby with some chic he is not serious with, bet you can guess who is fending for that one. Smarts are in the head of each to his own degree, school can only help if you pick wisely and most students even rely heavily on the net anyway.
I dropped out of high school, I am already looking better then my uncle is and I work less now and take less bullshit then he ever did. I hate to say it but it's true, love him as I do. Learn all you can from all sources, including the net, (((but let life teach you as well,,, something I was told Often when I was a kid because my parents weren't gonna fend for me once I was an adult.)))

Just call me Sally, I am not that smart, ;)


#48 MeAgain

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Posted March 22 2014 - 04:27 PM

My point is that although the internet is a great resource tool, you must be able to validate the material presented as fact.

As I pointed out in the quote, research has shown that individuals’ tend to select among all the data available to support attitudes and beliefs that they already hold. Many times data that does not support those ideas is rejected or misinterpreted so that the individuals' comfort zone is not upset.

So anyway, it depends on what your view of an education is. In my experience higher education has always allowed you to choose any major, minor, or class that you want. You don't even have to get a degree if you don't want to.
Grammar and high school are different as most cultures like to have citizens who are able to read, write, do basic math, have a cursory understanding of science, and display rudimentary hygiene.

If you study educational movements you will find that just about every concept imaginable has been tried at one time or another.
Classical, Contemplative, Critical Pedagogy, Democratic, Normative, Curriculum Theory, etc. This leads me to believe that using the internet has a place, but is not the end all educational method, and that universities will always have a place in education, if you understand that a university is not the buildings, but the educational society that makes it up.

To make the statement that "university is a waste of time", as the op did, and to find some here that appear to support that statement leads me to believe that they themselves have a very limited understanding of what a good education is as they think in very narrow terms. Just the thing that a good education tries to dissuade.

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#49 Wolf Angel.

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Posted March 22 2014 - 04:58 PM

Nothing is wasted in Life - it is all Experience.
The Diversity of a wider and more diversified company allows understanding and education there for the embracing.
Be it at an academic establishment or via the employment of after schooling, it all counts towards the road one takes.
Life, is what you make it

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#50 Sallysmart

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Posted March 22 2014 - 05:47 PM

To make the statement that "university is a waste of time", as the op did, and to find some here that appear to support that statement leads me to believe that they themselves have a very limited understanding of what a good education is as they think in very narrow terms. Just the thing that a good education tries to dissuade.


You might be right in some cases but I have seen some pretty stupid people who did several years of schooling just to come out a smart ass with no brains. Tis why I prefer to work for myself rather then have some idiot call himself my superior only to mess with my job.
We had supervisors in the last place I worked, tons of them and all but a few were knuckle heads, touching our stuff making things screw up and then calling out blame. I told a few of them to keep their paws off till they take my training as an operator, then things wouldn't shut down on us. Yet the company hired them on the basis they had all this training and three years experience. Mamma's boys, sent to school to get them out of Momma's basement. After so much crap I left and I am ten fold happier, less stressed and would never work for someone else again.
What's really funny is you could see them and their higher ups were taking a butt fucking from the top and when I went to get my tools from my shop after I had already quit and some time passed, a supervisor I really liked (one with the most time there) was with me. He was shaking and looked nervous. I asked what's up, he said his work was killing him, the pressure to make the top Happy is so bad they were all losing it. He then said I was lucky to be leaving it and he wished he could do the same. He was one of the highest paid there and yet his schooling does nothing till he applies it where he needs to.
I have since ran into people I worked with on the machines and the problem is even worse. They tell me all the time they want to quit and will and many have. Companies are at a push to feed the CEOs now and nothing else matters anymore and this company is suffering badly, peeps leaving, noobies coming in all the time and the peeps up stairs are scared shitless all the time that any day some tard is gonna come in and hand them their pink slip because it's that bad.
Numbers can't climb if you treat your workers and their bosses like crap.
We had a great shares level that declined more then half in a year once the new management came in. It never did recover and went down two thirds in total. I lost a lot of money there. Wanna work this way? Not anymore so watch what schooling you take, it could be your early heart attack. Even doctors in Canada are stressed now. I'm not, I have a job that a micro chip can't replace so I am not scared of losing it. It's mine and I have no smart ass boss overseeing it.

Just call me Sally, I am not that smart, ;)


#51 themnax

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Posted March 24 2014 - 03:25 PM

what i think is a waste of time is this myth that indenturing yourself to pay for an institutional education is supposed to be a ticket to a big income to pay it off with.

higher education need not be a complete waste if it is viewed as simply one of many ways of exploring and satisfying curiosity. that's what universities are supposed to be about. sciences and the arts. not all this nonsense about how to legally rob each other, otherwise known as business.

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#52 IamnotaMan I AM THOR

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Posted March 25 2014 - 01:12 AM

I suppose the best way to describe university is "an aspi.ration tax", for many/most people.

Certainly in America, and more so now in Britain etc, university technically bankrupts people. Except the law prohibits them from declaring bankruptcy. Which is pretty perverse. Atleast with the debt of a house, you can enjoy the house before its paid for. But for many, uni is just 3, 4, SEVEN years of lost income and work experience.

One big problem is that govts and employers simply haven't bothered to keep pace with the improving skills of the young workforce (despite the lies to the contrary). They'd rather get a young graduate in China/Indonesia to do the job, then shoot him if he doesn't do a 95 hr week.

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#53 Already in Use

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Posted July 06 2014 - 04:17 AM

College didn't work out for me. I was told basically that I was a certain kind of person that can only get a certain kind of career. I did enjoy the learning aspect of it and if I could have stayed there forever, I think would have, knowing well I never would have gotten the career because I'm a certain kind of person. But, the reality of my situation was weighting heavy on me with each passing year. So, I dropped out after several years.

Regardless of that, I'm sure there are more positive college experiences.

It really depends on the individual.

#54 I'minmyunderwear

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Posted July 06 2014 - 06:54 AM

College didn't work out for me. I was told basically that I was a certain kind of person that can only get a certain kind of career. I did enjoy the learning aspect of it and if I could have stayed there forever, I think would have, knowing well I never would have gotten the career because I'm a certain kind of person. But, the reality of my situation was weighting heavy on me with each passing year. So, I dropped out after several years.

Regardless of that, I'm sure there are more positive college experiences.

It really depends on the individual.


so, what kind of person and what kind of career were you?

#55 Already in Use

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Posted July 06 2014 - 08:10 AM

so, what kind of person and what kind of career were you?


I rather not talk about it.




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